Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • interjection Used to urge hounds on during a fox hunt.
  • intransitive verb To urge (hounds) on during a fox hunt by shouting “tallyho” when the fox is sighted.
  • intransitive verb To shout “tallyho” as a hunting cry.
  • noun The cry of “tallyho.”
  • noun A fast coach drawn by four horses.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To urge or excite, as hounds, by crying “Tally-ho.”
  • A hunting cry: a mere exclamation.
  • noun A cry of “Tally-ho.” See the interjection.
  • noun A name for a mail-coach or a four-in-hand pleasure coach; by extension, in the United States, a general name for such coaches.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • interjection The huntsman's cry to incite or urge on his hounds.
  • interjection A tallyho coach.
  • interjection a pleasure coach. See under Coach.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • interjection UK used to urge on a fox hunt, especially when the fox is sighted.
  • interjection a simple greeting, exclusively used by the upper classes.
  • noun the interjection.
  • verb to articulate the interjection.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Probably alteration of French taïaut, from Old French thialau, taho.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably alteration of French taïaut (interjection used in deer-hunting), from Middle French tahou, tayo, from Old French taho, ta ho, tielau (interjection given to hounds to return), composed of ta (particle used to prod animals) + ho ! ("halt!, hold!"). More at ho.

Examples

Comments

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  • "Stephen with hat ashplant frogsplits in middle highkicks with skykicking mouth shut hand clasp part under thigh, with clang tinkle boomhammer tallyho horn blower blue green yellow flashes." Joyce, Ulysses, 15

    January 1, 2008