Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Nautical A large, usually single-decked medieval ship of shallow draft, propelled by sails and oars and used as a merchant ship or warship in the Mediterranean.
  • n. Nautical An ancient Mediterranean seagoing vessel propelled by oars.
  • n. Nautical A large rowboat formerly used by British customs officers.
  • n. The kitchen of an airliner, ship, or camper.
  • n. Printing A long tray, usually of metal, used for holding composed type.
  • n. Printing Galley proof.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A long, slender ship propelled primarily by oars, whether having masts and sails or not; usually referring to rowed warships used in the Mediterranean from the 16th century until the modern era.
  • n. A light, open boat used on the Thames by customhouse officers, press gangs, and also for pleasure.
  • n. One of the small boats carried by a man-of-war.
  • n. The cookroom or kitchen and cooking apparatus of a vessel or aircraft; sometimes on merchant vessels called the caboose.
  • n. An oblong oven or muffle with a battery of retorts; a gallery furnace.
  • n. An oblong tray of wood or brass, with upright sides, for holding type which has been set, or is to be made up, etc.
  • n. A proof sheet taken from type while on a galley; a galley proof.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A vessel propelled by oars, whether having masts and sails or not.
  • n. A large vessel for war and national purposes; -- common in the Middle Ages, and down to the 17th century.
  • n. A name given by analogy to the Greek, Roman, and other ancient vessels propelled by oars.
  • n. A light, open boat used on the Thames by customhouse officers, press gangs, and also for pleasure.
  • n. One of the small boats carried by a man-of-war.
  • n. The cookroom or kitchen and cooking apparatus of a vessel; -- sometimes on merchant vessels called the caboose.
  • n. An oblong oven or muffle with a battery of retorts; a gallery furnace.
  • n.
  • n. An oblong tray of wood or brass, with upright sides, for holding type which has been set, or is to be made up, etc.
  • n. A proof sheet taken from type while on a galley; a galley proof.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A sea-going vessel propelled by oars, or using both oars and sails.
  • n. A state barge; a large boat, especially one used in display; in a special use, an open boat formerly employed on the Thames in England by custom-house officers and press-gangs, and for pleasure.
  • n. A boat, somewhat larger than a gig, appropriated for the captain's use on a war-ship. [Eng.]
  • n. The cook-room, kitchen, or caboose of a merchant ship, man-of-war, or steamer; also, the stove or range in the galley.
  • n. In printing, an oblong shallow tray of brass or wood, rarely of zinc, on which the compositor deposits his type.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a large medieval vessel with a single deck propelled by sails and oars with guns at stern and prow; a complement of 1,000 men; used mainly in the Mediterranean for war and trading
  • n. the kitchen area for food preparation on an airliner
  • n. the area for food preparation on a ship
  • n. (classical antiquity) a crescent-shaped seagoing vessel propelled by oars

Etymologies

Middle English galei, from Old French galie, from Old Provençal or Catalan galea, from Medieval Greek, probably variant of Greek galeos, shark, perhaps from galeē, weasel.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
First coined 1300, from Middle English galeie, from Latin galea, from Medieval Ancient Greek γαλέα (galea) of unknown origin, probably from Ancient Greek γαλέη (galeē), a kind of a small fish, from γαλεός (galeos, "dog-fish or small shark") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • You might, perhaps, come across the term galley proofs.

    How to read a publishing contract (6)

  • The floor of the galley is a couple of feet above the inside bottom of the

    Chapter 2

  • The floor of the galley is a couple of feet above the inside bottom of the Snark; and yet I have stood on the floor of the galley, trying to snatch a cold bite, and been wet to the knees by the water churning around inside four hours after the last pumping.

    The Inconceivable and Monstrous

  • Clean in galley, clean in steerage, clean in everything.

    CHAPTER X

  • Thomas Mugridge being duly bribed, the galley is pleasantly areek with the odour of their frying; while dolphin meat is served fore and aft on such occasions as Johnson catches the blazing beauties from the bowsprit end.

    Chapter 7

  • He reads my work when they are in galley stage and he's usually amazed that I'm able to make all this stuff up.

    How To Marry A Mystery Writer

  • There is an original story galley from a DAW anthology – my story “For These Things I Am Truly Thankful,” signed and with a cover flat from the anthology Haunted Holidays, where it appeared.

    Sins of the Flash - auctions...Pearl Harbor

  • Not one of these warriors, not even Arai would let you live (p. 7 in galley).

    Grass For His Pillow by Lian Hearn: Questions

  • He walked past the humans 'sleeping quarters, past the place of food they called the galley, until he was standing in the passage that opened into the open bubble of the cockpit.

    Voyage To The City Of The Dead

  • For all I could do, a galley is short of comforts; and he felt the pull of the oars.

    The Persian Boy

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.