Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A combat between two mounted knights or men-at-arms using lances; a tilting match.
  • n. A series of tilting matches; a tournament.
  • n. A personal competition or combat suggestive of combat with lances: a politician who relishes a joust with reporters.
  • intransitive v. To engage in mounted combat with lances; tilt.
  • intransitive v. To engage in a personal combat or competition.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tilting match: a mock combat between two mounted knights or men-at-arms using lances in the lists or enclosed field.
  • v. To engage in mock combat on horseback, as two knights in the lists; to tilt.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A tilting match; a mock combat on horseback between two knights in the lists or inclosed field.
  • n. Any competition involving one-to-one struggle with an opponent.
  • intransitive v. To engage in mock combat on horseback, as two knights in the lists; to tilt.
  • intransitive v. To engage in a competition involving one-to-one struggle with an opponent.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See just, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. joust against somebody in a tournament by fighting on horseback
  • n. a combat between two mounted knights tilting against each other with blunted lances

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French juste, from juster, to joust, from Vulgar Latin *iūxtāre, to be next to, from Latin iūxtā, close by; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French jouster (modern French: jouter), from late popular Latin juxtare. English since the early 14th century. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The joust was a contest between two knights; the tournament, between two bands of knights.

    Early European History

  • Mr Evans, you frequently misrepresent PMQs as some kind of joust, but as the PM has all the advantage and the usual purpose of oppostion leaders is to position themselves for the evening news, I feel you often give a poor analysis.

    Tony Blair: The Next Labour Prime Minister?

  • She had looked up 'joust' in the dictionary, and it seemed to her that in these few words was contained the kernel of her trouble.

    The Man Upstairs and Other Stories

  • This opening sprint is called the "joust," and if the respective jousters miraculously don't decapitate each other in the jockeying for first possession, the game is on.

    LJWorld.com stories: News

  • The long-running late-night chat shows with David Letterman (CBS) and Jay Leno (NBC) went on to poke fun at politicians routinely, even inviting them on to the shows in a kind of joust to test how much good humour they can muster in the face of the host's jabs.

    Adrian Monck

  • "[T] his engaging read, or read-aloud, is" joust "the ticket for all young fans of non-gender-specific knightly valor.

    Igraine The Brave by Cornelia Funke: Book summary

  • "joust" or obstruction at the bottom, which causes the toboggan and its occupants to leap into the air in a way that delights the experts and brings alarm to those who are taking their first ride.

    Healthful Sports for Boys

  • Presenting its Economic Trends surveys, he would joust good-humouredly with journalists about how far up an imaginary ladder the long-awaited economic recovery might have climbed.

    Sir James Cleminson obituary

  • "Guests have a choice of a safe, easy five-minute ride on another interview show to plug their movie, or they can come on for an hour and joust with an annoying Brit and if they succeed be the toast of America," Piers answered smugly, noting his British interview show has, on more than one occasion, attracted 8 million viewers.

    Pugnacious Piers Morgan chats up Oprah for his CNN debut

  • We tease and joust with barbed words but then call a truce and commit to loving each other.

    Exit the Actress

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Comments

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  • To ride a horse toward an opponent. Knights joused against each other centuries ago.

    December 6, 2010