Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or consisting of muscle: muscular contraction.
  • adj. Having well-developed muscles: a muscular build.
  • adj. Having or suggesting great forcefulness, especially at the expense of subtlety: muscular reasoning that does not bother with the finer points; muscular advocacy groups.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of, relating to, or connected with muscles.
  • adj. Brawny, having strength.
  • adj. Having large, well-developed muscles.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a muscle, or to a system of muscles; consisting of, or constituting, a muscle or muscles.
  • adj. Performed by, or dependent on, a muscle or the muscles.
  • adj. Well furnished with muscles; having well-developed muscles; brawny; hence, strong; powerful; vigorous.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining in any way to muscle or muscles; composing, constituting, or consisting of muscle: as, the muscular system; muscular origin or insertion; muscular fiber or tissue.
  • Done by or dependent upon muscle or muscles: as, muscular action; muscular movement; muscular strength.
  • Well-muscled; having well-developed muscles; strong; sinewy; brawny: as, a muscular man.
  • Figuratively, strong and vigorous.
  • One of the fibers of which muscular tissue is ultimately composed.
  • Synonyms Sinewy, stalwart, sturdy, lusty, vigorous, powerful.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. (of a person) possessing physical strength and weight; rugged and powerful
  • adj. having or suggesting great physical power or force
  • adj. having a robust muscular body-build characterized by predominance of structures (bone and muscle and connective tissue) developed from the embryonic mesodermal layer
  • adj. of or relating to or consisting of muscle

Etymologies

From Latin mūsculus, muscle; see muscle.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Borrowed from Latin mūsculāris in the 17th century. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • These are known as the _striated_, or striped, muscular tissue; the _non-striated_, or plain, muscular tissue; and the _muscular tissue of the heart_.

    Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools

  • He provides extensive new details about the Taliban insurgency, which he calls a muscular and sophisticated enemy that uses modern propaganda and systematically reaches into Afghanistan's prisons to recruit members and even plan operations.

    legitgov

  • I have even heard it maybe one of the causes of the increase in muscular dystrophy for adults.

    Sweet Deception

  • The pathway followed by small, watersoluble molecules in muscular capillaries is still under investigation.

    George E. Palade - Autobiography

  • Later, Hopkins worked with Walter Fletcher on the metabolic changes occurring in muscular contractions and rigor mortis.

    Sir Frederick Hopkins - Biography

  • Attempts have been made to follow the chemical processes involved in muscular activity by studying the changes of hydrogenion concentration by physical instruments.

    Archibald V. Hill - Nobel Lecture

  • A subsequent work contained the starting-point for a new method of investigation, which made it possible to trace the development of heat in muscular movements in their various stages.

    Physiology or Medicine 1922 - Presentation Speech

  • The work of the human organism is usually classified as muscular or intellectual.

    Increasing Human Efficiency in Business: A Contribution to the Psychology of Business

  • True, he is not what you would term muscular, but still he has muscles, which is more than he had when he came aboard.

    The Sea Wolf

  • Sinai Hospital for further tests on what was described as "muscular pain below the rib cage on the left side."

    Thestar.com - Home Page

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