Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One who drives a wagon.
  • n. Auriga.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. someone who drives a wagon

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who conducts a wagon; one whose business it is to drive a wagon.
  • n. The constellation Charles's Wain, or Ursa Major. See Ursa major, under Ursa.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who conducts or drives a wagon; a wagon-driver.
  • n. One who drives a chariot; a charioteer.
  • n. The constellation Auriga. See Auriga.
  • n. An atlas of charts: a name formerly in use, derived from a work of this nature published at Leyden in 1584-5 by Wagenaar.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the driver of a wagon

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The wagoner was a rough, profane, burly man, of generous feelings.

    David Crockett

  • The dear old 'wagoner's whip' has been replaced by a pert, perky squirt that will never stir the heart or brain of a future Ruth.

    A Book About Lawyers

  • The first sight the Gowans had of Spitalfields was from the front seat of a market wagon, pressed tightly between the wagoner, a small man with a squint and broken teeth, and the mountainous Daniel Nelligern.

    The Dressmaker

  • Soho the Dog: as a wagoner would his mudheeldy wheesindonk

    as a wagoner would his mudheeldy wheesindonk

  • June 16, 2007 as a wagoner would his mudheeldy wheesindonk

    Archive 2007-06-01

  • Hardly one cart or wagoner passes in a quarter of an hour.

    Les Miserables

  • They would meet wagons in the road, take the horses and leave the poor wagoner either swearing with rage or mute with astonishment.

    Cavalryman of the Lost Cause

  • During the trip, Boone worked as a wagoner alongside a trader named John Findley who had traveled to the Native American villages in Ohio and beyond.

    History of American Women

  • I say, if you help this institution you will be helping the wagoner who has resolutely put his own shoulder to the wheel, and who has

    Speeches: Literary and Social

  • The wagoner was trying roll them back into place on an improvised slide of poles, and a crowd had gathered to watch.

    City of Glory

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