Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One hired to serve as an attendant to a golfer, especially by carrying the golf clubs.
  • n. Scots A boy who does odd jobs.
  • n. Any of various devices for moving, carrying, or holding an item or collection of items, especially:
  • n. A lightweight wheeled cart, often fitted with shelves or racks.
  • n. A small tray with a handle and compartments for holding items such as toiletries or hardware.
  • n. A lightweight freestanding rack designed to hold accessories.
  • n. A small wheeled cart attached to a bicycle and used as a conveyance for a child.
  • n. A tea caddy.
  • intransitive v. To serve as a caddie.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A golfer's assistant and adviser.
  • n. A lightweight wheeled cart, often fitted with shelves or racks.
  • n. A lightweight freestanding rack designed to hold accessories.
  • n. Alternative form of cadie (Scottish errand boy)
  • v. To serve as a golf caddie.
  • n. A small tray with a handle and compartments for holding items.
  • n. A small wheeled cart attached to a bicycle and used as a conveyance for a child.
  • n. A tea caddy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A cadet.
  • n. A lad; young fellow.
  • n. One who does errands or other odd jobs.
  • n. An attendant who carries a golf player's clubs, tees his ball, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A cadet.
  • n. A boy, especially as employed in running errands; hence, specifically, one who gains a livelihood by running errands or delivering messages; also, one who carries the clubs of persons playing at golf.
  • n. An Australian bushman's name for a slouch hat, usually worn with the brim turned down at the back.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an attendant who carries the golf clubs for a player
  • v. act as a caddie and carry clubs for a player

Etymologies

Scots, from French cadet, cadet, caddie; see cadet.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Scots caddie, from the French cadet. (Wiktionary)
From Malay kati. (Wiktionary)

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