Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To make known publicly.
  • transitive v. To proclaim the presence or arrival of: announce a caller.
  • transitive v. To provide an indication of beforehand; foretell: The invention of the microchip announced a new generation of computers.
  • transitive v. To serve as an announcer for: announce a football game on TV.
  • intransitive v. To declare one's candidacy: was declared the front-runner even before she announced.
  • intransitive v. To serve as an announcer.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To give public notice, or first notice of; to make known; to publish; to proclaim.
  • v. To pronounce; to declare by judicial sentence.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To give public notice, or first notice of; to make known; to publish; to proclaim.
  • transitive v. To pronounce; to declare by judicial sentence.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make known formally; proclaim or make public; publish; give notice of: as, the birth of Christ was announced by an angel.
  • To state or intimate the approach, arrival, or presence of.
  • To make known, indicate, or make manifest to the mind or senses.
  • To pronounce; declare by judicial sentence.
  • Synonyms Declare, Announce, Proclaim, Publish, Promulgate; to make known, communicate, advertise, report. To declare is to make clear, so that there will be no mistake, to many or to few: as, to declare war. To announce is to make known, in a formal or official way, to many or to few; it is the only one of these words that sometimes has the meaning of making known the approach or future appearance of: as, to announce a new book. To proclaim is to announce to all, with an endeavor to force it upon general knowledge: when war has been declared, it is often proclaimed; so, also, it is usual to proclaim a blockade. To publish is to make public: as, to publish the bans. It may be orally or in print, or it may be to satisfy a legal requirement: as, to publish a law. To promulgate is to publish what is of concern to many, but hitherto has been known to few: as, to promulgate an opinion, to promulgate the gospel, or officially to promulgate a law or edict.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make known; make an announcement
  • v. announce publicly or officially
  • v. give the names of
  • v. foreshadow or presage

Etymologies

Middle English announcen, from Old French anoncier, from Latin annūntiāre : ad-, ad- + nūntiāre, to report (from nūntius, messenger.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French anoncier, from Latin annuntiare, from ad + nūntiō ("report, relate"), from nūntius ("messenger, bearer of news"). See nuncio, and compare with annunciate. (Wiktionary)

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