Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To estimate or calculate in advance, especially to predict (weather conditions) by analysis of meteorological data. See Synonyms at predict.
  • transitive v. To serve as an advance indication of; foreshadow: price increases that forecast inflation.
  • intransitive v. To calculate or estimate something in advance; predict the future.
  • n. A prediction, as of coming events or conditions.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To estimate how a condition will be in the future.
  • n. An estimation of a future condition.
  • n. A prediction of the weather.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Previous contrivance or determination; predetermination.
  • n. A calculation predicting future events; the foresight of consequences, and provision against them; prevision; premeditation.
  • intransitive v. To contrive or plan beforehand.
  • transitive v. To plan beforehand; to scheme; to project.
  • transitive v. To foresee; to calculate beforehand, so as to provide for.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To cast or contrive beforehand; plan before execution.
  • To consider or calculate beforehand; discern beforehand.
  • To make a plan or scheme in advance; contrive something beforehand.
  • To foresee; surmise.
  • n. Previous contrivance or provision; predetermination.
  • n. Foresight; prescience; prevision.
  • n. Synonyms Prudence, Providence, etc. (see wisdom); forethought, anticipation.
  • n. Specifically, in meteorology, a statement of the expected weather. Official daily weather forecasts were first published by Fitzroy in England in 1861.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. predict in advance
  • v. indicate by signs
  • n. a prediction about how something (as the weather) will develop
  • v. judge to be probable

Etymologies

Middle English forecasten, to plan beforehand : fore-, fore- + casten, to throw, calculate, prepare; see cast.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • If the forecast is accurate, temperatures will be dipping down below zero (as low as -10 F) which could be devastating for vineyards.

    The New York Cork Report:

  • Still, the company cautioned that this forecast is ambitious due to the strong euro and rising generic-drug competition.

    Chemicals Recovery Aids Bayer

  • Though the long-term forecast is hazy for players who have been linchpins for one of the decade's most successful teams, there's reason for optimism in the short run.

    Closing window: Can McNabb, Eagles take flight for title run?

  • The weather forecast is the same over half the year: "Sunny tomorrow with coastal fog extending inland night and morning."

    Stormy Weather

  • Now, these numbers that we're looking at here; this is what we call the forecast heat index.

    CNN Transcript Aug 7, 2007

  • Also implicit in our forecast is the assumption that Canada will continue to maintain a climate receptive to foreign capital.

    Looking Ahead

  • Manages budget, short term forecast and strategy plan processes.

    News - chicagotribune.com

  • However, the EIA short term forecast for WTI oil prices for the next couple of years still shows high oil prices.

  • "If they are profitable companies that have a future, have a footprint and are providing us with a medium to long-term forecast, that is positive economically for Ontario, that's the circumstance in which Ontario and Canada would enter into an agreement."

    Top Stories - Google News

  • In New Jersey, the economic forecast is particularly onerous, said Jeffrey Otteau, a real estate analyst.

    The Mulitgenerational Household in America is Making a Strong Comeback | Impact Lab

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • As compared to predicting after the fact.

    October 14, 2008