Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A garment worn below another.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A garment made for wearing under another garment.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a garment worn under other garments

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Over the purple under-garment came a I complex but graceful garment of bluish white, and I Graham was clothed in the fashion once more and saw himself, sallow-faced, unshaven and shaggy still, but at least naked no longer, and in some indefinable unprecedented way graceful.

    When the Sleeper Wakes

  • It might hardly seem necessary to refer to this fact, namely, that the under-garment which has been worn during the day should be taken off at night.

    The Art of Living in Australia

  • A flannel under-garment reaching from the neck well down to the hips should always be worn, and in summer it may be of a thinner material than in the cooler weather.

    The Art of Living in Australia

  • This may be provided for by taking care that the under-garment, when first obtained, is several sizes too large.

    The Art of Living in Australia

  • The flannel under-garment which has been worn during the day can then be taken off at night without any danger, and has the opportunity of being aired.

    The Art of Living in Australia

  • After they were twelve years old, they were no longer allowed to wear any under-garment; they had one coat to serve them a year; their bodies were hard and dry, with but little acquaintance of baths and unguents; these human indulgences they were allowed only on some few particular days in the year.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • The dress of the dancers is peculiar, composed of a wide red divided skirt, a white under-garment, and a long gauze mantle.

    Travels in the Far East

  • It may fairly be inferred that the name of this under-garment is derived from the word mentioned in the text; and doubtless there are many words in our own as well as in other modern languages that may equally be traced to Asia; for instance, Sheittan,

    A Peep into Toorkisthhan

  • Over a short white under-garment, whose name of Kammese [*] sufficiently denotes its use, is a Peir [= a] n or jacket, which amongst the higher classes is made of Bokh [= a] ra cloth, or not unfrequently of

    A Peep into Toorkisthhan

  • Now when most blessed Senanus saw Saint Kyaranus coming to him, in an under-garment, he chid him sportively, saying, "Is it not shame that a presbyter should walk in a sole under-garment, without a cowl?"

    The Latin & Irish Lives of Ciaran Translations Of Christian Literature. Series V. Lives Of The Celtic Saints

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