Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A small stream, often a shallow or intermittent tributary to a river. Also called regionally branch, brook1, kill2, run.
  • n. A channel or stream running through a salt marsh: tidal creeks teeming with shore wildlife.
  • n. Chiefly British A small inlet in a shoreline, extending farther inland than a cove.
  • idiom up the creek (without a paddle) Informal In a difficult, unfortunate, or inextricable position.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small inlet or bay, narrower and extending further into the land than a cove; a recess in the shore of the sea, or of a river.
  • n. A stream of water smaller than a river and larger than a brook.
  • n. Any turn or winding.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A small inlet or bay, narrower and extending further into the land than a cove; a recess in the shore of the sea, or of a river.
  • n. A stream of water smaller than a river and larger than a brook.
  • n. Any turn or winding.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To twist and wind; form a creek.
  • n. A small inlet, bay, or cove; a recess in the shore of the sea or of a river, or of any considerable body of water.
  • n. A small stream; a brook; a rivulet. See crick.
  • n. A turn or winding.
  • n. Hence A device; an artifice; a trick.
  • n. A small seaboard town of insufficient importance to have a customs-station of its own.
  • n. An obsolete spelling of creak.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any member of the Creek Confederacy (especially the Muskogee) formerly living in Georgia and Alabama but now chiefly in Oklahoma
  • n. a natural stream of water smaller than a river (and often a tributary of a river)

Etymologies

Middle English creke, probably from Old Norse kriki, bend.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
creke, from kryk, from Old Norse kriki. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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