Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To salute or welcome in a friendly and respectful way with speech or writing, as upon meeting or in opening a letter.
  • transitive v. To receive with a specified reaction: greet a joke with laughter.
  • transitive v. To be perceived by: A din greeted our ears.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Great.
  • v. To weep; to cry.
  • n. Mourning, weeping, lamentation.
  • v. To address with salutations or expressions of kind wishes; to salute; to hail; to welcome; to accost with friendship; to pay respects or compliments to, either personally or through the intervention of another, or by writing or token.
  • v. To come upon, or meet, as with something that makes the heart glad.
  • v. To accost; to address.
  • v. To meet and give salutations.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Great.
  • n. Mourning.
  • n. Greeting.
  • intransitive v. To weep; to cry; to lament.
  • intransitive v. To meet and give salutations.
  • transitive v. To address with salutations or expressions of kind wishes; to salute; to hail; to welcome; to accost with friendship; to pay respects or compliments to, either personally or through the intervention of another, or by writing or token.
  • transitive v. To come upon, or meet, as with something that makes the heart glad.
  • transitive v. To accost; to address.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To address formally, as on meeting or in writing or sending a letter or message; give or send salutations to; accost; salute; hail.
  • To congratulate.
  • To salute on meeting.
  • To weep; cry.
  • n. A greeting.
  • n. Weeping; crying; a cry; complaint.
  • n. An obsolete or dialectal form of grit.
  • n. An obsolete or dialectal form of grit.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. be perceived by
  • v. express greetings upon meeting someone
  • v. send greetings to
  • v. react to in a certain way

Etymologies

Middle English greten, from Old English grētan.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old English grētan, from Proto-Germanic *grōtijanan. Cognate with Dutch groeten, German grüßen. Compare Old Saxon grotian, Old Frisian greta, Old High German gruozen. Cognate to Albanian grish ("to invite, call"). (Wiktionary)
From a blend of two Old English verbs, grētan (cognate with Swedish gräta', Danish græde) and grēotan (of uncertain ultimate origin), both ‘weep, lament’. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • Waving flags and blowing whistles, they raved and stamped around the frightened stone-still Thaw until his lips trembled and a drop of water spilled from his left eye.
    "Look!" they yelled. "He's greeting!" "Crybaby! Crybaby!"

    - Alasdair Gray, Lanark, ch. 12

    January 19, 2009