Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Size.
  • n. Lack of refinement in character, behaviour etc.; coarseness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The state or quality of being gross; thickness; corpulence; coarseness; shamefulness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or quality of being gross, in any sense; especially, indelicacy; rudeness; vulgarity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the quality of lacking taste and refinement

Etymologies

From gross +‎ -ness. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Of the obstinate effort to bring about an armed intervention, on the lines marked out by Russell’s letter to Palmerston from Gotha, 17 September, 1862, nothing could be said beyond Gladstone’s plea in excuse for his speech in pursuance of the same effort, that it was “the most singular and palpable error, ” “the least excusable, ” “a mistake of incredible grossness, ” which passed defence; but while Gladstone threw himself on the mercy of the public for his speech, he attempted no excuse for Lord Russell who led him into the “incredible grossness” of announcing the Foreign Secretary’s intent.

    The Battle of the Rams (1863)

  • Yet even here the grossness is but little more pronounced than what we find in our old drama (e. g.,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • With succeeding Lord Horror works, each one aims to out-do the preceding one in grossness.

    Ballardian » “Driven by Anger”: An Interview with Michael Butterworth (the Savoy interviews, part 1)

  • ANY way was an act of violence, for what did it consist of but the obtrusion of the idea of grossness and guilt on a small helpless creature who had been for me a revelation of the possibilities of beautiful intercourse?

    The Turn of the Screw

  • Hence a bumping lass is a large girl of her age, and a bumpkin is a large-limbed, uncivilized rustic; the idea of grossness of size entering into the idea of a country bumpkin, as well as that of unpolished rudeness.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 14, No. 387, August 28, 1829

  • They argue that Shakespeare's coarseness is the result of the age and not personal predilection, completely ignoring the work of men like Sir Philip Sidney and Spenser, indeed practically all the pre-Shakespearean writers, in whom none of this so-called grossness exists.

    Lysistrata

  • To do it in ANY way was an act of violence, for what did it consist of but the obtrusion of the idea of grossness and guilt on a small helpless creature who had been for me a revelation of the possibilities of beautiful intercourse?

    The Turn of the Screw

  • To do it in any way was an act of violence, for what did it consist of but the obtrusion of the idea of grossness and guilt on a small helpless creature who had been for me a revelation of the possibilities of beautiful intercourse?

    The Turn of the Screw

  • It would be too simple to call grossness the last (or the next) frontier, although some critics out there will, but

    GreenCine Daily

  • It wasn't scary or traumatic; it was gross, but it was the kind of grossness that pre-teen boys revel in.

    Raiders of the Lost Ark

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