Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who ravishes.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who ravishes (in any sense).

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who ravishes or takes by violence.
  • n. One who violates the chastity of a woman.
  • n. One who or that which transports with delight.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. someone who assaults others sexually
  • n. a very attractive or seductive looking woman

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “You, icy sweetness of strawberry, chocolate or vanilla, melting, stickily into your inverted dunce cap, ravisher of appetites, leading the younger generation from the straight and narrow paths of spinach, pilferer of the pennies that might go to make a fortune; destroyer of the peace of homes, instrument of bribery and reward of virtue.”

    One Big Table

  • "No ... no!" she faltered, and for an instant I checked in astonishment: the sight of Flashy stark and slavering might well strike maidenly terror in amateurs and virgins (my second bride, Duchess Irma, near had the conniptions on our wedding night) but this was a seasoned strumpet ... and then I twigged, this must be her special ploy to rouse the rou's, playing the helpless fawn shrinking before the roaring ravisher.

    THE NUMBERS

  • Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm; tell him to moderately rescue his wife from the hands of a ravisher; tell the mother to gradually extricate her babe from the fire into which it has fallen; but urge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present.

    Campaigning in Herts and Beds with Sian Berry

  • Have I then in earnest sinned so far in my imperial duty, as to make it just to apply to me the warning used by the injured Cleonice to her ravisher and murderer?

    Count Robert of Paris

  • The holy prelate there orders the young woman to be restored to her parents, the ravisher to be excluded from prayers, and declared to be excommunicated, together with his accomplices and all his household, for three years; he also orders that all the people of the village where the ravished person was received, shall be excommunicated.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • At the same time, a voice cried from the other side that she must give it back to the ravisher.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • “Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm,” he said, “tell him to moderately rescue his wife from the hands of the ravisher; tell the mother to gradually extricate her babe from the fire into which it has fallen.”

    You Can't "Moderate" Out of War

  •         Else admire not if each ravisher angrily fly.

    Poems and Fragments

  • All the shame lay on the ravisher only and I am content to take all the blame upon me, as I have already borne too great a share for what I have not deserved.

    Pamela

  • After such offers, and such threatenings, and his comparing himself to a wicked ravisher in the very time of his last offer; and turning it into a jest, that we should make a pretty story in a romance; can I stay and be safe?

    Pamela

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Comments

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  • "SECOND SERVANT: 'Tis so: and as war in some sort, may be said to be a ravisher, so it cannot be denied but peace is a great maker of cuckolds."
    - William Shakespeare, 'The Tragedy of Coriolanus'.

    August 29, 2009