Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or characteristic of being wanton; recklessness, especially as represented in lascivious or other excessive behavior.
  • n. A particular wanton act.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality or state of being wanton; negligence of restraint; sportiveness; recklessness; lasciviousness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or character of being wanton, in any sense.
  • n. A wanton or outrageous act.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the trait of lacking restraint or control; reckless freedom from inhibition or worry
  • n. the quality of being lewd and lascivious

Etymologies

wanton +‎ -ness (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • “He is Ghanim son of Ayyub,” replied she, “for he never approached me in wantonness or with lewd intent, I swear by thy munificence, O Commander of the Faithful!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Yet it was not done in wantonness, but as a terrible necessity of war.

    This Country of Ours: The Story of the United States

  • I believe that nothing would tend so effectually to get rid of these creations of idleness, weariness, and that “over-stimulation of the emotions” which, in plainer-spoken days, used to be called wantonness, than

    Thomas Henry Huxley

  • I believe that nothing would tend so effectually to get rid of these creations of idleness, weariness, and that "over-stimulation of the emotions" which, in plainer-spoken days, used to be called wantonness, than

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Character Sketch

  • I believe that nothing would tend so effectually to get rid of these creations of idleness, weariness, and that "over-stimulation of the emotions" which, in plainer-spoken days, used to be called wantonness, than a fair share of healthy work, directed towards a definite object, combined with an equally fair share of healthy play, during the years of adolescence; and those who are best acquainted with the acquirements of an average medical practitioner will find it hardest to believe that the attempt to reach that standard is like to prove exhausting to an ordinarily intelligent and well-educated young woman.

    Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley — Volume 2

  • At the outset men had found it impossible to speak too strongly of the "wantonness" of women.

    Little Essays of Love and Virtue

  • Adultery -- omitted in the oldest manuscripts. lasciviousness -- rather, "wantonness" petulance, capricious insolence; it may display itself in "lasciviousness," but not necessarily or constantly so (Mr 7: 21, 22, where it is not associated with fleshly lusts) [Trench].

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • It was not because he was suspicious still, but in a kind of wantonness of affection, and as if by way of giving yet greater zest to the luxury of their mutual trust that Duke Carl added to his announcement of the purposed place and time of the event a pretended test of the girl's devotion.

    Imaginary Portraits

  • It was not because he was suspicious still, but in a kind of wantonness [150] of affection, and as if by way of giving yet greater zest to the luxury of their mutual trust that Duke Carl added to his announcement of the purposed place and time of the event a pretended test of the girl's devotion.

    Imaginary Portraits

  • The objects themselves, which in that place of sorrow lie before our view, naturally give us a seriousness and attention, check that wantonness which is the growth of prosperity and ease, and head us to reflect upon the deficiencies of human life itself; that _every man at his best estate is altogether vanity_.

    Human Nature and Other Sermons

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