Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An abbreviation of the Middle and New Latin Artium Baccalaureus, Bachelor of Arts. In England it is more commonly written B. A. See bachelor.
  • n. An abbreviation of able-bodied, placed after the name of a seaman on a ship's papers.
  • n. An abbreviation of Latin ante Christum, before Christ, used in chronology in the same sense as B. C.; army-corps.
  • An abbreviation of the Latin phrase anno Domini, in the year of the Lord: as, A. D. 1887.
  • An abbreviation of adjutant-general.
  • An abbreviation of the Latin anno hejiræ, in the year of the hejira, or flight of Mohammed from Mecca, a. d. 622.
  • An abbreviation of several Latin phrases in common use:
  • Of artium magister, Master of Arts. M. A., which represents the English rendering, is now more usual in England, but in a purely Latin idiom the form A. M. is still preferable.
  • Of anno mundi, in the year of the world: used in some systems of chronology.
  • Of ante meridiem, before noon: as, the party will start at 10 A. M. (also written a. m. or a. m.). Frequently used as synonymous with morning or forenoon: as, I arrived here this A. M. (pronounced ā em), that is, this morning or forenoon.
  • n. An abbreviation of Anglo-Saxon.
  • In electricity, an abbreviation for alternating current.
  • An abbreviation of Analytical Chemist.
  • n. An abbreviation of Attorney-General.
  • n. In astronomy, an abbreviation of Argelan-der-Oeltzen, referring to a catalogue of southern stars observed by Argelander in zones and reduced to a regular catalogue by Oeltzen.
  • n. In electricity, an abbreviation of ampere-turn.
  • n. An abbreviation of Authorized Version.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • St. Thomas (II-II, Q. xlvii, a. 8) it is its function to do three things: to take counsel, i.e. to cast about for the means suited in the particular case under consideration to reach the end of any one moral virtue; to judge soundly of the fitness of the means suggested; and, finally, to command their employment.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • ( "Summa", III, Q. lxxvii, a. 2) makes all the accidents "related to their subject by the medium of dimensive quantity, as the first subject of colour is said to be the superficies".

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Hence St. Thomas (II-II, Q. lxxxi, a. 1) defines religion as "virtus per quam homines Deo debitum cultum et reverentiam exhibent" (the virtue which prompts man to render to God the worship and reverence that is His by right).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • God wills that His nature should be manifested in the highest possible way, and hence has created things like to Himself not only in that they are good in se, but also in that they are the cause of good in others (I, Q. ciii, a. 4, 6).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • "Una poena damni, in quantum scilicet retardantur a divina visione; alia sensus secundum quod ab igne punientur", and St. Bonaventure not only agrees with St. Thomas but adds (IV, dist. xx, p. 1, a. 1, q. ii) that this punishment by fire is more severe than any punishment which comes to men in this life; "Gravior est omni temporali poena. quam modo sustinet anima carni conjuncta".

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Andreana (Andrew's cross) because, according to tradition, St. Andrew suffered death upon a. cross of that form; another was formed like the letter T, and a Roman writer, Lucian, uses that fact in disparagement of the letter itself.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • II-II, Q. lxxxi, a. 1, gives all three derivations without pronouncing in favour of any.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • This excludes chance, which is a relative term and implies merely that some things happen irrespective of, or even contrary to, the natural purpose and tendency of some particular agent, natural or free (I, Q. xxii, a. 2; Q. cvi, a. 7; Q. cxvi, a. 1); not that things happen irrespective of the supreme and universal cause of all things.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • St. Thomas maintained that a precept does not bind except through the medium of knowledge: "Unde nullus ligatur per praeceptum aliquod nisi mediante scientia illius" ( "De Veritate", Q. xvii, a. 3); and Probabilists are accustomed to point out that knowledge implies certainty.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • St. Thomas naturally objects to the use of this term (I, Q. cxvi, a. 1).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

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