Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Roman Mythology The god of water, later identified with the Greek Poseidon.
  • n. The sea.
  • n. The eighth planet from the sun, having a sidereal period of revolution around the sun of 164.8 years at a mean distance of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles), a mean radius of 24,000 kilometers (15,000 miles), and a mass 17.2 times that of Earth.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The god of the ocean and of earthquakes.
  • proper n. The eighth planet in our solar system, represented in astronomy and astrology by ♆.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proper n. The son of Saturn and Ops, the god of the waters, especially of the sea. He is represented as bearing a trident for a scepter.
  • proper n. The remotest major planet of our solar system, discovered -- as a result of the computations of Leverrier, of Paris -- by Galle, of Berlin, September 23, 1846. It is classed as a gas giant, and has a radius of 22,716 km and an estimated mass of 1.027 x 1026 kg, with an average density of 2.27 g/cc. Its mean distance from the sun is about 5,000,000,000 km (3,106,856,000 miles), and its period of revolution is about 164.78 years.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Roman mythology, the god of the sea, who came to be identified by the Romans themselves with the Greek Poseidon, whose attributes were transferred by the poets to the ancient Latin deity.
  • n. Figuratively, the ocean.
  • n. In heraldry, same as Triton.
  • n. The outermost known planet of the solar system, and the third in volume and mass, though quite invisible to the naked eye.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a giant planet with a ring of ice particles; the 8th planet from the sun is the most remote of the gas giants
  • n. (Roman mythology) god of the sea; counterpart of Greek Poseidon

Etymologies

Latin Neptūnus.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin Neptūnus. (Wiktionary)

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