Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • v. Second person singular and plural and first and third person plural present indicative of be.
  • n. A metric unit of area equal to 100 square meters (119.6 square yards).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An accepted (but deprecated and rarely used) SI unit of area equal to 100 square metres, or a former unit of approximately the same extent. Symbol: a
  • v. second-person singular simple present tense of be
  • v. first-person plural simple present tense of be
  • v. second-person plural simple present tense of be
  • v. third-person plural simple present tense of be

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The present indicative plural of the substantive verb to be; but etymologically a different word from be, or was. Am, art, are, and is, all come from the root as.
  • n. The unit of superficial measure, being a square of which each side is ten meters in length; 100 square meters, or about 119.6 square yards.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • The present indicative plural of the substantive verb to be. See be.
  • n. In the metric system, a unit of superficial or square measure, containing 100 square meters, or 119.6 square yards. Its abbreviation is adjective
  • n. The note immediately above the tonic, ut, in the grave hexachord of Guido d'Arezzo's musical scale.
  • n. A suffix applied to the names of orders in the quantitative classification of igneous rocks proposed by Cross, Iddings, Pirsson, and Washington: as, canadare, columbare. See classification of igneous rocks, under rock.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a unit of surface area equal to 100 square meters

Etymologies

Middle English aren, from Old English aron; see er-1 in Indo-European roots.
French, from Latin ārea, open space; see area.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English aren, from Old English earun, earon ("are"), reinforced by Old Norse plural forms in er- (displacing alternative Old English sind and bēoþ), from Proto-Germanic *arun (“(they) are", originally, "(they) became”), from the third person plural preterite indicative form of *iranan (“to rise, be quick, become active”), from Proto-Indo-European *er-, *or(w)- (“to rise, lift, move”). Cognate with Old Norse erun ("(they) are"), Old English eart ("(thou) art"). More at art. (Wiktionary)
From French are. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • Modern art? Crossword puzzle clue.

    January 11, 2014

  • Norwegian male name, most popular in the northern parts.

    March 29, 2009