Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To cause to withdraw into seclusion.
  • transitive v. To remove or set apart; segregate. See Synonyms at isolate.
  • transitive v. Law To take temporary possession of (property) as security against legal claims.
  • transitive v. Law To requisition and confiscate (enemy property).
  • intransitive v. Chemistry To undergo sequestration.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To separate from all external influence.
  • v. To separate in order to store.
  • v. To prevent an ion in solution from behaving normally by forming a coordination compound
  • v. To temporarily remove (property) from the possession of its owner and hold it as security against legal claims.
  • v. To remove (certain funds) automatically from a budget.
  • v. To seize and hold enemy property.
  • n. sequestration; separation
  • n. A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who mediates between two parties; a referee.
  • n. A sequestrum.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Sequestration; separation.
  • n. A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who mediates between two parties; a mediator; an umpire or referee.
  • n. Same as Sequestrum.
  • intransitive v. To withdraw; to retire.
  • intransitive v. To renounce (as a widow may) any concern with the estate of her husband.
  • transitive v. To separate from the owner for a time; to take from parties in controversy and put into the possession of an indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as property belonging to another, and hold it till the profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or till the owner has performed the decree of court, or clears himself of contempt; in international law, to confiscate.
  • transitive v. To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration; to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc.
  • transitive v. To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from other things.
  • transitive v. To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude; to withdraw; -- often used reflexively.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To put aside; remove; separate from other things; seclude; withdraw.
  • In law:
  • To separate from the owner for a time; seize or take possession of, as the property and income of a debtor, until the claims of creditors be satisfied.
  • To set aside from the power of either party, as a matter at issue, by order of a court of law. For use in Scots law, see sequestrate. See also sequestration. Hence To seize for any purpose; confiscate; take possession of; appropriate.
  • To withdraw.
  • In law, to renounce or decline, as a widow any concern with the estate of her husband.
  • n. The act of sequestering; sequestration; separation; seclusion.
  • n. In law, a person with whom two or more parties to a suit or controversy deposit the subject of controversy; a mediator or referee between two parties; an umpire.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. requisition forcibly, as of enemy property
  • v. keep away from others
  • v. undergo sequestration by forming a stable compound with an ion
  • v. set apart from others
  • v. take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authority

Etymologies

Middle English sequestren, from Old French, from Latin sequestrāre, to give up for safekeeping, from Latin sequester, depositary, trustee; see sekw-1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Late Latin sequestrō ("set aside"), from Latin sequester ("mediator, trustee"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • It should be interesting to see how April and Libra make out in sequester house.

    Catfight in sequester house : Bev Vincent

  • Reforesting large areas of degraded landscape is central to the project's goal of promoting sustainable use of tropical forests, whose conservation Goodall believes is vital in the fight against climate change because of their ability to "sequester" -- or remove -- CO2 from the atmosphere.

    Rainforest Portal RSS Newsfeed

  • 8 Responses to “Catfight in sequester house” siradaono

    Catfight in sequester house : Bev Vincent

  • The reason is we provided for a backstop in case Congress didn't act on time, this so-called sequester that is put into statute at the end of the year, taking effect a year later.

    Budgets, Business and Bernanke

  • The second debt limit increase will require an additional $1.2 trillion reduction to be accomplished either by the super committee or by automatic across-the-board spending reductions called a sequester—a budget-control mechanism from Gramm-Rudman.

    The Budget Sequester's Silver Lining

  • The enforcement mechanism—known as a sequester''—would force cuts for all federal programs including defense spending, an area some Republicans have proposed protecting.

    Boehner Presses for Deficit Deal

  • If the $1.2 trillion target isn't reached by Nov. 23, or Congress doesn't approve a bill by Dec. 23, deep spending cuts known as a "sequester" would begin to take effect in 2013.

    Gimmicks Could Help Rescue Deficit Talks

  • Because naturally no one trusted anyone else in this game, the money would then be deposited with a second category of agent, known as the sequester, who would hold the cash available for inspection.

    Imperium

  • This action, called a "sequester," would also generate $169 billion in saving from lower interest costs on the national debt.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • The sequester is a threat to the national security interests of the United States, and it should not be allowed to occur.

    The Seattle Times

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