Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A dense growth of trees, plants, and underbrush covering a large area.
  • n. Something that resembles a large, dense growth of trees, as in density, quantity, or profusion: a forest of skyscrapers.
  • n. A defined area of land formerly set aside in England as a royal hunting ground.
  • transitive v. To plant trees on.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A dense collection of trees covering a relatively large area. Larger than woods.
  • n. Any dense collection or amount.
  • n. A defined area of land set aside in England as royal hunting ground or for other privileged use; all such areas.
  • n. A disjoint union of trees.
  • v. To cover an area with trees.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a forest; sylvan.
  • n. An extensive wood; a large tract of land covered with trees; in the United States, a wood of native growth, or a tract of woodland which has never been cultivated.
  • n. A large extent or precinct of country, generally waste and woody, belonging to the sovereign, set apart for the keeping of game for his use, not inclosed, but distinguished by certain limits, and protected by certain laws, courts, and officers of its own.
  • transitive v. To cover with trees or wood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A tract of land covered with trees; a wood, usually one of considerable extent; a tract of woodland with or without inclosed intervals of open and uncultivated ground.
  • n. In Great Britain, a designation still retained for some large tracts of land or districts formerly but not now covered with trees or constituting royal forests (see below), especially such as have some of the distinctive characteristics or uses of wild or broken woodland, as the Forest of Dean in England or some of the deer-forests of Scotland.
  • n. In English law, and formerly also in Scots law, a territory of woody grounds and pastures privileged for wild beasts and fowls of chase and warren to rest and abide in, generally belonging to the sovereign, and set apart for his recreation, or granted by him to others, under special laws, and having officers specially appointed to look after it; a hunting-preserve maintained at public expense for royal or aristocratic use: specifically called a royal forest.
  • Pertaining or relating to forests; sylvan: as, forest law.
  • To cover with trees or wood; afforest.
  • n.
  • n. In phytogeography, specifically, a closed woodland, that is, one in which the crowns of the trees touch.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. establish a forest on previously unforested land
  • n. land that is covered with trees and shrubs
  • n. the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin forestis (silva), outside (forest), from Latin forīs, outside; see dhwer- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English forest, from Old French forest, from Medieval Latin foresta ("open wood"), first used in the Capitularies of Charlemagne in reference to the royal forest (as opposed to the inner woods, or parcus). Displaced native Middle English weald, wald ("forest, weald"), from Old English weald, Middle English scogh, scough ("forest, shaw"), from Old Norse skógr, and Middle English frith, firth ("forest, game preserve"), from Old English fyrhþ.

Examples

  • This region of dense tropical rain forest is situated on the lowland plateau in the central northern portion of the Amazon Basin in Brazil with tiny sections just touching Colombia and Venezuela.

    Japurá-Solimoes-Negro moist forests

  • Along the clearwater Tapajós and Aripuanã Rivers, white-sand igapó forest is predominant, hosting large trees such as Triplaris surinamensis, Piranhea trifoliata, Copaifera martii, and Alchornea castaneaefolia in forest that is slightly more open than that in non-flooded areas.

    Madeira-Tapajós moist forests

  • Written by Betty J. Meggers, the Smithsonian archaeologist, Amazonia says that the apparent lushness of the rain forest is a sham.

    1491

  • Northern visitors 'first reaction to the storied Amazon rain forest is often disappointment.

    1491

  • Much of the destruction of the rain forest is at the hands of out-of-work and dislocated campesinos trying to feed their families.

    The Oaxaca Newsletter volume 5, No. 14: August 15, 2000

  • The term forest bathing is just a way to encapsulate the concept.

    The Globe and Mail - Home RSS feed

  • The storybook about a stumpy little guy who stands on a tree stump deploring the destruction of a forest is being adapted into a 3-D ...

    Danny DeVito To Star In Dr. Seuss' 'Lorax' Movie

  • The storybook about a stumpy little guy who stands on a tree stump deploring the destruction of a forest is being adapted into a 3-D animated feature by the team that made Despicable Me and Horton Hears a Who.

    Danny DeVito To Star In Dr. Seuss' 'Lorax' Movie

  • The only light remaining for the forest is at the top half of the tree.

    A Geo-Political Rant. Again.

  • He also said the potential for a crown fire briefly increases in the early stages of a beetle epidemic, when the forest is a mixture of dying, dead and living trees.

    Study: Beetle invasions dampen, not intensify, wildfire risk

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