Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An unbroken view of an entire surrounding area.
  • n. A comprehensive presentation; a survey: a panorama of American literature.
  • n. A picture or series of pictures representing a continuous scene, often exhibited a part at a time by being unrolled and passed before the spectator.
  • n. A mental vision of a series of events.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. an unbroken view of an entire surrounding area
  • n. a picture or series of pictures representing a continuous scene
  • n. a comprehensive survey

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A complete view in every direction.
  • n. A comprehensive survey of a particular topic; also, a broad view of the development of a series of events.
  • n. A picture presenting a view of objects in every direction, as from a central point.
  • n. A picture representing scenes too extended to be beheld at once, and so exhibited a part at a time, by being unrolled, and made to pass continuously before the spectator.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A complete or entire view; also, a picture representing a wide or general view, as of a tract of country.
  • n. A picture representing scenes too extended to be beheld at once, and so exhibited a part at a time by being unrolled and made to pass continuously before the spectator.
  • n. A cyclorama: in this sense also called circular panorama.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the visual percept of a region
  • n. a picture (or series of pictures) representing a continuous scene

Etymologies

pan- + Greek horāma, sight (from horān, to see; see wer-3 in Indo-European roots).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From pan- (“all”) +‎ Ancient Greek ὅραμα ("view"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The notion of plenitude can be conveyed by employing the term panorama ` an unlimited view in all directions 'in a promotional blurb.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol X No 4

  • 'Rombo' was one of the first sounds generated by a noise machine, while 'rama' comes from the Greek word panorama, which means an overview of the complexity of human activity, thus making Romborama an appropriate album name.

    Grooveeffect

  • You both make good points, and the in camera panorama is no doubt a good way to play around with panoramas, but with all the extra power, aswell as the extra options, customisability etc that you get in software instead of in-camera, if you start to get into it, it's really worth taking the step up to the computer dreamlayers

    Take Great Panoramic Pictures With Any Camera | Lifehacker Australia

  • One of the crucial elements to a natural-looking panorama is even exposure.

    Take Great Panoramic Pictures With Any Camera | Lifehacker Australia

  • The overall tone of the collection, despite the general grimness of the panorama, is gentle and serene.

    Circus Bulgaria by Deyan Enev – review

  • •View 360-degree panorama from the right-field bleachers

    A tribute to the 'House that Ruth Built'

  • When in Clun you should also visit the castle (another panorama from the BBC), and John Osborne's grave is just up the road from the bridge.

    Clun Bridge

  • The "McMurdo panorama" is a combination of more than 1400 individual pictures which were taken when the lack of sunlight didn't allow the rover to move during the Marsian winter.

    Archive 2007-03-01

  • Finally, though, if the panorama is implicated in the panoptic fantasy of an all-seeing vision, then the logic of the Diorama (though similarly preoccupied by the enticements of illusion) must be expressed differently.

    Making Visible: The Diorama, the Double and the (Gothic) Subject

  • The panorama is arguably uncanny in relation to space in another sense as well, at least in the cases in which the inside walls of the rotunda revealed a mechanical replication of the invisible vistas of home (as in Horner's London, for Londoners).

    Making Visible: The Diorama, the Double and the (Gothic) Subject

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