Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Experiencing nausea; nauseated.
  • adj. Easily nauseated.
  • adj. Causing nausea; sickening: the queasy lurch of an airplane during a storm.
  • adj. Causing uneasiness.
  • adj. Uneasy; troubled.
  • adj. Easily troubled.
  • adj. Ill at ease; squeamish: "He is not queasy about depicting mass violence, in some circumstances, as a legitimate instrument of social transformation” ( Shaul Bakhash).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. experiencing or causing nausea or uneasiness, often characterized by an unsettled stomach
  • adj. easily troubled; squeamish

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Sick at the stomach; affected with nausea; inclined to vomit; qualmish.
  • adj. Fastidious; squeamish; delicate; easily disturbed; unsettled; ticklish.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Affected with nausea; inclined to vomit.
  • Fastidious; squeamish; delicate.
  • Apt to cause nausea; occasioning uncomfortable feelings; hence, requiring to be delicately handled; ticklish; nice.
  • Short; brief.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. causing or able to cause nausea
  • adj. feeling nausea; feeling about to vomit
  • adj. causing or fraught with or showing anxiety

Etymologies

Middle English coisy, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English coysy, possibly from Old Norse kveisa ("boil") ( > Norwegian kveise/kvise), perhaps influenced by Anglo-Norman queisier, from Old French coisier ("to wound, hurt, make uneasy"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • You mean like queasy descriptions of luncheon meats?

    January 11, 2008

  • Okay, I think WeirdNet is just completely bonkers on this one. I have never heard "queasy" used to describe something that makes a person nauseated.

    January 11, 2008