Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The right or privilege of voting; franchise.
  • n. The exercise of such a right.
  • n. A vote cast in deciding a disputed question or in electing a person to office.
  • n. A short intercessory prayer.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The right or chance to vote, express an opinion, or participate in a decision.
  • n. A vote in deciding a particular question.
  • n. The right to vote for elected officials in a representative democracy.
  • n. The right of women to vote.
  • n. A prayer, for example a prayer offered for the faithful dead.
  • n. A short petition, as those after the creed in matins and evensong.
  • n. Aid, intercession.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A vote given in deciding a controverted question, or in the choice of a man for an office or trust; the formal expression of an opinion; assent; vote.
  • n. Testimony; attestation; witness; approval.
  • n.
  • n. A short petition, as those after the creed in matins and evensong.
  • n. A prayer in general, as one offered for the faithful departed.
  • n. Aid; assistance.
  • n. The right to vote; franchise.
  • transitive v. To vote for; to elect.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To vote for; elect.
  • n. A vote or voice given in deciding a controverted question, or in the choice of a person to occupy an office or trust; the formal expression of an opinion on some doubtful question; consent; assent; approval.
  • n. The political right or act of voting; the exercise of the voting power in political affairs; especially, the right, under a representative government, of participating, directly or indirectly, in the choice of public officers and in the adoption or rejection of fundamental laws: usually with the definite article.
  • n. Testimony; attestation; witness.
  • n. Eccles., an intercessory prayer or petition.
  • n. In liturgics: Short petitions, especially those in the litany, the lesser litany or preces at morning and evening prayer, etc.
  • n. The prayers of the people in response to and as distinguished from the versicles or prayers said in litanies by the clergyman.
  • n. Aid; assistance; relief.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a legal right guaranteed by the 15th amendment to the US Constitution; guaranteed to women by the 19th amendment

Etymologies

Middle English, intercessory prayer, from Old French, from Medieval Latin suffrāgium, from Latin, the right to vote, from suffrāgārī, to express support; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English "prayers or pleas on behalf of another", from Old French, from Medieval Latin suffragium, from Latin suffragium ("support, vote, right of voting"). The sense of "vote" or "right to vote" was directly derived from classical Latin. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This first clause, then, fixes the class of persons to whom belong this right of suffrage -- _Federal suffrage_ -- not State suffrage.

    History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II

  • I, however, stood boldly up for the great and just principle of universal suffrage, and moved, as an amendment to the motion made by Mr. Cobbett, that instead of _householder suffrage_, universal suffrage should be substituted.

    Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. — Volume 2

  • Coincidentally, the term suffrage is synonymous with voting, and the term sufferance means to give passive consent.

    Teknosis

  • ’ ‘What about the Sthenoboea of Euripides, the Revellers of Ameipsias—to which, as a matter of simple fact, what you call the suffrage of antiquity did adjudge the first prize, above Aristophanes’ best?

    II. Apprehension versus Comprehension

  • 'What about the "Sthenoboea" of Euripides, the "Revellers" of Ameipsias -- to which, as a matter of simple fact, what you call the suffrage of antiquity did adjudge the first prize, above Aristophanes' best? '

    On The Art of Reading

  • As a moral matter, however, anything other than universal suffrage is incompatible with the fundamental values underlying its creation: the just powers of government by consent.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Violent Misdemeanants, the Right to Bear Arms, and the Right to Vote

  • Universal suffrage is an impracticable piece of nonscense; — Republicanism will only do in new establishd countrys: not in those which have been govern'd by Kings for a thousand years. —

    Letter 354

  • As political goals go, universal suffrage is pretty concrete and non-fictional.

    Matthew Yglesias » George Will’s Odd Aversion to Democracy

  • That universal suffrage is a lot more likely to happen with Gaza & a remnant of the West Bank being dumped at the doorsteps of Jordan & Egypt (they hold elections, you know). pseudonymous in nc Says:

    Matthew Yglesias » By Request: Israeli Election

  • Like universal free public education, universal suffrage is a truly revolutionary concept.

    Yesterday I Voted

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