Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Music The third tone of the diatonic scale in solfeggio.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A Roman numeral representing one thousand and one (1001).
  • n. A syllable used in sol-fa (solfège) to represent the third note of a major scale.
  • abbr. Alternative form of mi..

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A syllable applied to the third tone of the scale of C, i. e., to E, in European solmization, but to the third tone of any scale in the American system.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In solmization, the syllable used for the third tone of the scale. In the scale of C this tone is E, which is therefore sometimes called mi in France, Italy, etc.
  • n. An abbreviation
  • n. of mile;
  • n. of mill or mills;
  • n. of milliampere.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the government agency in the United Kingdom that is responsible for internal security and counterintelligence on British territory
  • n. a unit of length used in navigation; exactly 1,852 meters; historically based on the distance spanned by one minute of arc in latitude
  • n. a unit of length equal to 1,760 yards or 5,280 feet; exactly 1609.344 meters
  • n. the syllable naming the third (mediant) note of any major scale in solmization
  • n. a former British unit of length equivalent to 6,080 feet (1,853.184 meters); 800 feet longer than a statute mile
  • n. the government agency in the United Kingdom that is responsible for internal security and counterintelligence overseas
  • n. a midwestern state in north central United States in the Great Lakes region
  • n. destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle

Etymologies

Middle English, from Medieval Latin; see gamut.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

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