Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • interjection Used to command an animal pulling a load to turn to the right.
  • intransitive verb To turn to the right.
  • noun A thousand dollars.
  • noun The letter g.
  • noun A unit of acceleration equal to 9.80665 meters (32.174 feet) per second per second, approximating the acceleration of gravity at the earth's surface.
  • interjection Used as a mild expletive or exclamation, as of surprise, enthusiasm, or sympathy.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To agree; suit; fit.
  • Crooked; awry.
  • A dialectal form of give.
  • To move to one side; in particular, to move or turn to the off side, or from the driver—that is, to the right, the driver standing on the left or nigh side: used by teamsters, chiefly in the imperative, addressed to the animals they are driving: often with off.
  • To move; stir.
  • To cause to move or turn to the off side, or from the driver: as, to gee a team of oxen.
  • To move: as, ye′ re no able to gee it.
  • noun Stubbornness; pettishness.
  • noun An affront.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb Colloq. or Prov. Eng. To agree; to harmonize.
  • intransitive verb To turn to the off side, or from the driver (i.e., in the United States, to the right side); -- said of cattle, or a team; used most frequently in the imperative, often with off, by drivers of oxen, in directing their teams, and opposed to haw, or hoi.
  • intransitive verb Same as Gee.
  • transitive verb To cause (a team) to turn to the off side, or from the driver.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The name of the Latin script letter G/g.
  • noun slang Abbreviation of grand; a thousand dollars.
  • noun physics Abbreviation of gravity; the unit of acceleration equal to that exerted by gravity at the earth's surface.
  • noun US, slang A guy.
  • verb To turn right or to cause to turn right.
  • interjection A general exclamation of surprise or frustration.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb turn to the right side
  • verb give a command to a horse to turn to the right side
  • noun a unit of force equal to the force exerted by gravity; used to indicate the force to which a body is subjected when it is accelerated

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From gee, from the first letter of grand.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Pronunciation spelling of the letter g, abbreviation of acceleration of gravity.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Alteration of Jesus.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Pronunciation of the letter G.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Unknown

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

A shortening of Jesus, perhaps as in the oath by Jesus

Examples

Comments

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  • "The first two took the wrong, short route around the corner and over the log. My dogs made as if to follow them. I stamped hard on the brake.

    "'Gee!' I shouted. The dogs looked around, confused.

    "'Gee!' I shouted again, and eased off the brake a little. The dogs nudged forward, straight on.

    "I stopped them again. 'Gee!' I hollered. Ichabod looked around and wagged his tail. I took my foot slightly off the brake once more. Again, they headed straight on.

    "'Gee!' I shouted again. The Japanese woman turned around and looked at me as though I were mad.

    "'Gee!' I hollered in vain. In the end, we had been there too long. Frank and the others would be sitting waiting on the river, wondering what on earth could have happened to us in that short distance. And so I abandoned my hopes for perfection and took the shortcut over the log.

    "'Oh, Ichabod, he doesn't know the commands,' Frank told me later. 'He's just young. I only put him in front because it's the only place he can't chew everything. And I put Klukshu alongside because he's the only one that'll put up with him.'"

    --Polly Evans, Mad Dogs and an Englishwoman: Travels with Sled Dogs in Canada's Frozen North (NY: Bantam Dell, 2008), 70

    January 25, 2017