Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Irène

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A surname, especially referring to Marie Curie and her husband Pierre Curie.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun French physicist; husband of Marie Curie (1859-1906)
  • noun French chemist (born in Poland) who won two Nobel prizes; one (with her husband and Henri Becquerel) for research on radioactivity and another for her discovery of radium and polonium (1867-1934)
  • noun a unit of radioactivity equal to the amount of a radioactive isotope that decays at the rate of 37,000,000,000 disintegrations per second

Etymologies

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Examples

  • I mean, there's all those historical scientists, good old Marie Curie (I was in Curie House at school, too), or Rosalind Franklin and all the handy assistance she gave Crick and Watson.

    Susannah's Journal

  • I mean, there's all those historical scientists, good old Marie Curie (I was in Curie House at school, too), or Rosalind Franklin and all the handy assistance she gave Crick and Watson.

    skittledog: Finding Ada Lovelace in my friends

  • Curie is best known for her dedication to to studies in radiation, promoting the use of radium to alleviate suffering.

    All Things Girl » All Things Girl » Blog Archive » Inspirational Women: Marie Curie

  • As it goes on, it's clear that Curie is held out as an exception - a woman "as good as a man" at science.

    Archive 2007-02-01

  • As it goes on, it's clear that Curie is held out as an exception - a woman "as good as a man" at science.

    View of Marie Curie in 1927

  • The great success of Professor and Madame Curie is the best illustration of the old proverb, coninucta valent, union is strength.

    Nobel Prize in Physics 1903 - Presentation Speech

  • Moreover, he proved that ferromagnetic substances exhibited a critical temperature transition, above which the substances lost their ferromagnetic behavior; this is now known as the Curie point.

    Curie, Pierre

  • Pierre also discovered the effect of temperature on paramagnetism, which is now known as Curie's law.

    Curie, Pierre

  • He showed that the magnetic properties of a given substance change at a certain temperature - this temperature is now known as the Curie point.

    Pierre Curie - Biography

  • The cutoff point is called the Curie temperature, measured in kelvins.

    IEEE Spectrum

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