Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The early form of oak, preserved (through the shortening of the vowel before two consonants) in certain place-names (whence surnames): as, Acton [⟨ AS. Āctū n], literally, oak-town, or dwelling among the oaks: Acley or Ackley, also Oakley [⟨ AS. Ācleá], literally, oak-lea.
  • noun A prefix, assimilated form of ad- before c and q, as in accede, acquire, etc.; also an accommodated form of other prefixes, as in accurse, accloy, accumber, etc. See these words.
  • etc. Points of flexure in the heating curves of iron and steel. The point ac1 on heating is the same as ar1 on cooling, etc.
  • noun An adjective-suffix of Greek or Latin origin, as in cardiac, maniac, iliac, etc. It is always preceded by -i- and, like -ic, may take the additional suffix -al.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun acron. an electric current that reverses direction sinusoidally. Alternative to direct curent, DC.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • conjunction obsolete, dialectal, Scotland But.
  • initialism account; money of account
  • initialism acre
  • initialism air conditioning
  • initialism alicyclic
  • initialism electricity alternating current
  • initialism medicine ante cibum, before meals

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a radioactive element of the actinide series; found in uranium ores
  • noun an electric current that reverses direction sinusoidally

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, ac, oc, from Old English ac, oc ("but, for, because", conjunction), from Proto-Germanic *ak (“but, moveover”).

Examples

Comments

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  • Obsolete conjunction meaning "but".

    December 6, 2007

  • Ac. Chemical element symbol for Actinium.

    December 16, 2007

  • Short for ante cibum on Rx.

    February 18, 2009

  • "1. The early form of oak, preserved (through the shortening of the vowel before two consonants) in certain place-names (whence surnames): as, Acton AS. Āctū n, literally, oak-town, or dwelling among the oaks: Acley or Ackley, also Oakley AS. Ācleá, literally, oak-lea." --Cent. Dict.

    April 26, 2011