Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Resistant to authority or discipline; recalcitrant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Unwilling to be taught or instructed; intractable or recalcitrant.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Not teachable; indisposed to be taught, trained, or disciplined; not easily instructed or governed; dull; intractable.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not teachable; not submissive to instruction or guidance; intractable.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of persons

Etymologies

From either the French indocile or the Latin indocilis. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • While her ladyship declaimed, the clergyman's wandering eye confessed his absent mind; his thoughts travelling, perhaps, to accomplish a truce betwixt Saladin and Conrade of Mountserrat, unless they chanced to be occupied with some occurrences of that very day, so that the lady was obliged to recall her indocile auditor with the leading question, "You are well acquainted with Dryden, of course, Mr. Cargill?"

    St. Ronan's Well

  • a truce betwixt Saladin and Conrade of Mountserrat, unless they chanced to be occupied with some occurrences of that very day, so that the lady was obliged to recall her indocile auditor with the leading question,

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • The bullet that pierced Alexis's heart was not a random bullet shot from a cop's gun to the body of an 'indocile' kid.

    Anarkismo.net

  • A feeling of sudden, proud self-confidence, an indocile wish to walk unmoved in spite of grim environments, plainly possessed him, and when he reached the wicket-gate he turned in without apparent effort.

    Wessex Tales

  • But it was an indocile, a scornful, and a sarcastic face - the face of a man difficult to lead, and impossible to drive.

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

  • Professor Paul Emanuel, to wit, never lost an opportunity of intimating his opinion that mine was rather a fiery and rash nature — adventurous, indocile, and audacious.

    Villette

  • The vulgar of all ranks are invariably sensual and indocile; yet

    The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • The cabmen of Paris form a distinct class, a separate society, composed of all sorts of elements -- a turbulent, indocile, rebellious set of men, always in revolt against their employers and against the law, which holds them with an iron and inflexible grasp.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 102, June, 1876

  • Mount Pruno, till, finding disciples there no less indocile to the severity of his discipline than the former, he was determined to pursue himself that rigorous plan of life which he had hitherto unsuccessfully proposed to others.

    The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints January, February, March

  • The present existence of the Church, after it has encountered and outlived all varieties of opposition, is in itself a proof which even its enemies, if they were not stupid and indocile learners, might ere this have discovered, that the eternal God is its refuge, and that the Highest will establish it for ever.

    The Wesleyan Methodist Pulpit in Malvern Sermons Preached at the Opening Services of the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, in 1866

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