Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Disturbed digestion; indigestion.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A generic term for mild disorders of digestion, characterised by stomach pain, discomfort, heartburn and nausea, often following a meal.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • A kind of indigestion; a state of the stomach in which its functions are disturbed, without the presence of other diseases, or, if others are present, they are of minor importance. Its symptoms are loss of appetite, nausea, heartburn, acrid or fetid eructations, a sense of weight or fullness in the stomach, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Impaired power of digestion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a disorder of digestive function characterized by discomfort or heartburn or nausea

Etymologies

Latin, from Greek duspepsiā : dus-, dys- + -pepsiā, digestion.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From dys- + pepsin + -ia (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Hence, although the meaning of dyspepsia must be restricted, as its derivations demand; the term, digestion, bears a much more extensive signification than it generally receives, and any error in its process may be properly denominated indigestion; however, Mr. Halsted regards the term dyspepsia as equivalent to indigestion, and we may, for once, adopt the same phraseology.

    The American Quarterly Review, No. 17, March 1831

  • He had what they call dyspepsia, which I-- I guess means an upset stomach and heartburn, constantly sleep deprived, constipated.

    1863: Rebirth of a Nation

  • Long has he promised to try the breezes of the plains for what he calls dyspepsia, and the artist calls

    Jan of the Windmill

  • About 20 percent of people in the U.S. suffer at least once a week from symptoms of acid reflux, or heartburn (also known as dyspepsia, indigestion, sour stomach, or agita), and another 20 percent have it less frequently.

    Holiday help for heartburn

  • About 20 percent of people in the U.S. suffer at least once a week from symptoms of acid reflux, or heartburn also known as dyspepsia, indigestion, sour stomach, or agita, and another 20 percent have it less frequently.

    Holiday help for heartburn

  • His dyspepsia is the most important issue of the world with him, and he

    From a Girl's Point of View

  • It is now very well known that a great many cases of so-called dyspepsia are really due to over-solicitude about food and the elimination from the diet of so many articles supposed to be indigestible that the patient's nutrition is seriously interfered with.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Where do you encounter the unhappy male creature who has been told that the only cure for his dyspepsia is to be a Rebecca at the Well and drink a gallon of water before each meal and then go without the meal, thus compelling him to double in both roles and first be Rebecca and then be the Well?

    Cobb's Bill-of-Fare

  • Discovery, four bottles of Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription, and about half-a-dozen packages of his "Pellets," I am convinced that I am thoroughly cured of that dread disease, known as dyspepsia, and other troublesome complaints.

    The People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English or, Medicine Simplified, 54th ed., One Million, Six Hundred and Fifty Thousand

  • Thus there is engendered, a permanent disorder which, for politeness 'sake, is called dyspepsia, and for which different remedies are often sought but never found.

    Grappling with the Monster The Curse and the Cure of Strong Drink

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