Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The style of writing often held to be characteristic of newspapers and magazines, distinguished by clichés, sensationalism, and triteness of thought.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A style of writing used in some newspapers and magazines, characterized by cliché, hyperbolic language and clipped syntax.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. the linguistic style in which newspapers are written.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A style of writing fit only for rapid newspaper work; a style abounding in pretentious words and sudden colloquialisms and making crude bids for popularity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the style in which newspapers are written

Etymologies

journal +‎ -ese (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This reminds me of the to-do a few years back (late 20th-early 21st century) when someone Chinese decided that the suffix '-ese' had a derogatory meaning in English (as in 'journalese').

    languagehat.com: CHINESE 'JEW.'

  • QUOTE ABOVE: This reminds me of the to-do a few years back (late 20th-early 21st century) when someone Chinese decided that the suffix '-ese' had a derogatory meaning in English (as in 'journalese').

    languagehat.com: CHINESE 'JEW.'

  • This, of course, leads to that particular form of "journalese" in which a cricket-ball becomes a "leathern missile" and so forth.

    The Adventure of Living : a Subjective Autobiography

  • "journalese;" and as the picturesque reporter is a greater power in

    America To-day, Observations and Reflections

  • "Is sufficiently — er — journalese?" he interrupted suavely.

    Local Color

  • Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation.

    Hito

  • Military imagery has long been a staple of political rhetoric--and of political journalese.

    Gunsights or Surveyor Symbols?

  • This relatively new adjective (first recorded in 1907) has lately become something of a minor irritant to a few usage commentators, who have described it variously as ‘journalese’ (Zinsser 1976), ‘a suspicious overstatement for “perceptive”’ (Strunk & White 1979) and ‘jargon’ (Janis 1984).

    March « 2009 « Sentence first

  • Such scandalous journalese, however, pales in comparison to the appalling treatment of friends and relatives of Ethiopian passengers.

    Flight ET409 Exposes Lebanon's Racist Underbelly

  • In another he dubs Variety's founder "osteopath of the English language and inventor of some of the most unfettered journalese ever to be set in type."

    MoMA Marches to the Beat of History

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