Comments by gulyasrobi

  • Fish can be curious...
    Funny compound adjectives of a highly technical nature - never listed on Wordnik before.

    April 30, 2013

  • 474 words so far. Help to achieve the 500 mark!
    To my knowledge there is no way of extracting these words from any text automatically. This remains a manual job.
    Remember: the compound must have a figurative meaning.

    April 21, 2013

  • New definition (as of 2012):
    To remove a post from the top position in Facebook

    March 17, 2013

  • Hungary in the English-speaking press 2010-2014

    March 11, 2013

  • Changed your mind? Unenroll from Wordnik.

    February 14, 2013

  • http://www.economist.com/blogs/bagehot/2012/06/britain-and-eu-0
    Together with Grexit, Brixit is a buzzword in European journalism these days.

    February 14, 2013

  • Great list! My list Figuratively used compounds http://www.wordnik.com/lists/figuratively-used-compounds'>http://www.wordnik.com/lists/figuratively-used-compounds follows a very similar line, only the words are written together. Check it out if you like.

    January 17, 2013

  • A posh and very British way of saying "bullshit" is "poppywash". Oh, how much more decent, isn't it?

    January 15, 2013

  • The word "poppywash" is a new entry (as of today by myself) to Wordnik. Stephen Fry uses the word "poppywash" in the sense of "bullshit" on page 6 of the 2011 Penguin edition of "The Fry Chronicles". Urban dictionary defines the word as "bullshit, old English slang for expressing anger".

    January 15, 2013

  • Hi marky, thank you for your likes. You're welcome to add some naval terms if you are familiar with the subject matter, I would appreciate it a lot.

    December 21, 2012

  • Degrowth is a new but increasingly popular concept. "Degrowth theorists" and "degrowth movements" dream of a "happy degrowth". I am surprised to see that no one on Wordnik has listed it, yet. http://blogs.euobserver.com/jacobs/2012/11/15/why-the-eu-must-dare-to-debate-degrowth/

    December 12, 2012

  • unsuck, unsucking
    http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3099

    December 6, 2012

  • Words and expressions used by interpreter trainers, aspiring and practicing conference interpreters when talking about their job. The vocabulary of conference interpreting.

    December 3, 2012

  • Words of Greek and Latin origin and their meanings in English

    November 30, 2012

  • The word refers to the Petraeus affair - fall 2012 (fall of a chief spy)

    November 28, 2012

  • skyfall and spyfall
    recent neologisms about the same theme:
    the rise and fall of secret agents (fall 2012)

    November 27, 2012

  • In the age of artificial intelligence and the semantic web, collocations sorted by thematic categories are useful contributions to people who work in the business of CAT and strive to make machine translation tools based on semantically annotated statistical information work better.

    October 29, 2012

  • Here is a word cloud of about 200 nouns that have proved to be the most productive constituents of noun-noun collocations. The bigger the print the more frequently the noun enters into collocational relationship with others. With these 200 nouns you can compose more than 10000 valid collocations. How can I tell? Because they were derived from more than 10000 noun-noun collocations: http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/5929881/Most_active_noun-noun_collocates

    October 29, 2012

  • Dear kalayzich,

    Thank you for your comments and corrections.
    Answering your question:
    The purpose of my investigation is having fun with a language I learn and love. Undersanding why certain nouns are more active collocates than others. In other cases: collecting words and collocations that I find useful in my work as an interpreter (for interpreters collocations are a lot more interesting than words, because each collocation represents a neuronal connection).
    No, vocabgrabber wasn't my source, only the tool with which I sorted a big collection (mostly hand-picked) of noun-noun collocations that I had put together over the years. Oy yes, another motivation: I love text-mining as a pastime (I am crazy). However strange it might sound to you: I don't give a (what's the proper word here?) whether I am first or last on this list. That's the point I have always wanted to make. I just like Wordnik and playing around. Maybe too much for my health, but it has little to do with adrenalin. Hope you liked my reply.
    : -)

    October 29, 2012

  • In the 1960s, in a vote publicised by The Times newspaper, the Robin was adopted as the unofficial national bird of the UK.

    October 29, 2012

  • :-)

    October 28, 2012

  • My Dear Friend, Kalayzich,

    Please find your list “simpson's frequency word usage” of 5001 “words”, cleaned from numbers, individual letters and stuff like

    “ii, i-i, ''i, homer|, homerj, g, -g, 'em, do|, dad|, bart|, off|, right|, sir|, what|, yeah|, you|, you|to, here|, man|, marge|, me|, mom|, no|, not|”

    (I have no idea why Wordnik made two files from one)

    Apart from the fact that uploading frequency lists to Wordnik is a rather unimaginative practice, you should at least take care to clean your lists from rubbish before you do so.

    Wordnik is “all the WORDS”, so uploading prime numbers in batches and frequency lists with the words ordinal numbers does not make much sense to me.

    But I may be wrong. So please feel free to download and upload the file I have cleaned for you under your name again (I will certainly delete it from among my lists, once you have done so.) I think it’s just silly to compete for primacy by any means, “just because”.

    I have certainly no intention to compete with you in any way, and if I upload or do not upload files in the future will have nothing to do with your existence.

    Text mining and putting together lists should be fun or could be a job-related obligation, but it is certainly not something which should motivate anyone to fight. Feel free to use Wordnik and be the FIRST, if this is your passion, but stop uploading numbers. Or have you thought of going swimming, instead?

    Being a lexicographer has definitely something in common with being a thief, but even criminals of our sort may take pride in adding some value manually to the stuff that we have stolen.

    In friendship,

    Robert

    October 28, 2012

  • "curly quotation mark" and "forward slash" were "quotation mark" and "slash" before typewriters and computers invented new breeds of these characters. Can you think of other traditional characters that need an adjective in front, because they were made obsolete by modern character sets?

    October 27, 2012

  • Once new generation technologies make the original products obsolete, the latter soon need an adjective in front...

    October 27, 2012

  • HU: a jo a rosszban, minden rosszban van valami jo

    October 23, 2012

  • This list contains the words that can be defined as follows: - the person upon whom one coughs at
    - appalled over how much weight you have gained
    - to give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach
    - to attempt an explanation while drunk
    impotent
    - describes a condition in which you absentmindedly answer the door in your nightgown
    - to walk with a lisp
    - olive-flavored mouthwash
    - emergency vehicle that picks you up after you are run over
    - a rapidly receding hairline
    - a humorous question on an exam
    - the formal, dignified bearing adopted by proctologists
    - a Rastafarian proctologist
    - a person who sprinkles his conversation with Yiddishisms
    - the belief that when you die, your soul flies up onto the roof and gets stuck there
    - an opening in the front of boxer shorts worn by Jewish men

    October 21, 2012

  • More -gates (added 20 new scandals).

    October 17, 2012

  • In one word: generonyms

    October 16, 2012

  • Not just words, ACTION.

    October 7, 2012

  • Reversable collocations. Some are perfect matches, for others you have to use your imagination. They have one thing in common: reversed, they are just as valid collocations, sometimes with a surprising meaning. Reversing collocations reveals a lot about their inherent semantic structure.

    October 3, 2012

  • Using an adequate set of collocates (in this case 20 words) and a permutation generator, you can easily generate hundreds of collocations. Possibly, the number of collocations in a given language is at least one if not two orders bigger than the number of words. If the number of distinct words in EN is estimated to be in the billions, the number of EN collocations must be in the ten to hundred billion range. Is there a point in collecting and recording collocations? I am open for interesting arguments pro and con.

    October 2, 2012

  • HU: véraláfutás(os)

    September 30, 2012

  • HU: varsa

    September 30, 2012

  • HU: gyutacs

    September 30, 2012

  • DE: Blitzbesuch

    September 24, 2012

  • I love this one.

    September 22, 2012

  • Cool list

    September 22, 2012

  • A tribute to Wordnik

    September 20, 2012

  • Thanks for the etymological explanations on winnowing.
    For pictures about these ancient tools see: http://vunex.blogspot.be/2006/11/unknown-object-part-ii.html

    September 20, 2012

  • Heureka!
    From now, you can order your lists (alphabetically, by creation date).
    Thank you (3x), Wordnik!
    It was a nice surprise when I sat down to work, this morning.
    :-)

    September 20, 2012

  • Words and MWEs that evoke the atmosphere of James Joyce's world.

    September 20, 2012

  • :-)

    September 20, 2012

  • The Iliad - key words and phrases

    September 20, 2012

  • "Woosterisms" as heard from the character " Wooster" in P.G. Wodehouse's "Jeeves and Wooster" stories.

    September 20, 2012

  • "Jeevesisms" as heard from the valet Jeeves in P.G. Wodehouse's "Jeeves and Wooster" stories.

    September 20, 2012

  • My hand-made glossary of all Odyssean terms including our childhood's favourites like "bright-eyed Athene", "wine-dark sea", "rosy-fingered Dawn", "long suffering Odysseus"... Enjoy and add more if any else springs to your mind.

    September 19, 2012

  • "on the coattails of" in HU = "vki/vmi farvizén (beevezni)"

    September 18, 2012

  • We are all lexicographers, aren't we?

    September 16, 2012

  • :-)

    September 14, 2012

  • "mole burrow" in HU = vakondtúrás

    September 14, 2012

  • "butthead" in HU = "seggfej" (literally)

    September 14, 2012

  • "wise-acre" in HU = "seggfej" (arse-head)

    September 14, 2012

  • Gulyas is a goyish genius craving for guyish gizmos... ;-)

    September 14, 2012

  • See more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_Nazi_Germany

    September 14, 2012

  • HU for "sagacity" = itelokepesseg

    September 13, 2012

  • Try with ";"-s

    September 11, 2012

  • There is a similar list on Wordnik with stricter thematic criteria on the same subject:
    http://www.wordnik.com/lists/bible---words-you-immediately-associate-with-the-bible

    September 11, 2012

  • Thank you, ruzuzu.

    September 11, 2012

  • Can you think of more?

    September 9, 2012

  • Just words...

    September 4, 2012

  • FR: résolution de défaillance bancaire
    HU: bank-konszolidacio / felszamolas / szanalas

    September 4, 2012

  • FR: appui/protection financière (un filet de sécurité)
    HU: penzugyi vedohalo (mentocsomag)

    September 4, 2012

  • Open for contributions.

    September 1, 2012

  • For comparison see my list: http://www.wordnik.com/lists/what-barack-is-talking-about

    September 1, 2012

  • Key terms from Mitt Romney's election campaign. Have I missed anything?

    September 1, 2012

  • Empty promises. THE words and expressions to use when you want to win over the masses or just don't know what to say.

    "CAPITAL" stands for the administrative capital of your country
    "NATIONAL" stands for your nationality
    "THIS COUNTRY" stands for the name of your country

    For a visual representation of the frequency of individual words in this list go to: http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/5629147/Election_campaign_vocabulary

    August 31, 2012

  • This list is far from being complete. I have a gut feeling that humankind's love of power and hierachy is such, that alone in English there must be thousands of words for people in power. Please add more, if you like.

    August 31, 2012

  • Do you (native speakers of English) agree, when I assume that what an "ass munch" does, is basically "fartsplitting"?

    August 30, 2012

  • HU equivalent: "kecskére bízza a káposztát" (appoint the goat to guard the cabbage)

    August 30, 2012

  • For a visual representation of the words in this list see: http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/5622309/All_about_politics

    August 30, 2012

  • Filthy buzz.

    August 30, 2012

  • "Fornication" is not equal to "formication".
    Words with funny meaning or spelling.

    August 30, 2012

  • There are thousands of gestures in human communication. Some are understood everywhere, some are understood everywhere but differently and some are linked to cultures or groups of people. Please add more if you know them by (English) name.

    August 30, 2012

  • The universe as IKEA sees it.

    Furniture, haberdashery, household articles and a lot more. The bulk of the list (750 entries) are IKEA articles in the original English version IKEA uses but further additions from US and UK sources have been made. Please feel free to add items but try to observe the spelling conventions (lower-case characters, plural only with small items where the use of the singular is less common)

    August 29, 2012

  • For cheese lovers: http://www.memrise.com/cave/?iset=cheeses (excellent picture dictionary and learning tool)

    August 28, 2012

  • One good turn deserves another.

    August 28, 2012

  • Cool, thanks, kalayzich! From among the ones you have provided I could add more than 60 new noun-noun collocates to my list! A word of assurance: I'm not going to list ALL Englich collocates on Wordnik. I am concentrating on the ones only that fit well into my "business" or interest me from a linguistic point of view...

    August 28, 2012

  • You heard these as a child.
    :-)
    You will say these as a parent.
    :-(

    August 28, 2012

  • The word "business" is an unually active collocation head in English noun-noun collocations. Sometimes plurals are more common than singulars. I never listed both. Try to find more "business" noun-noun collocates, if you like.

    August 28, 2012

  • Apnoe?

    August 19, 2012

  • How about "embargo", "embargoed" talking of not-yet released sensitive documents?

    August 19, 2012

  • All my contributions are in Hungarian. The alphabetical listing helps compare the different language versions. The English part of the list is far from complete. Good luck.

    August 19, 2012

  • "röf-röf" is Hungarian baby talk for what a pig "says".

    August 19, 2012

  • A cool list.

    August 19, 2012

  • For unity's sake I also made my contributions lower case, but these projects are all proper names, and some are mosaic words that normally spell upper case.

    August 19, 2012

  • Bingo!

    August 19, 2012

  • Or rather: academia

    August 19, 2012

  • Look again.

    August 18, 2012

  • For poltical journalists the use of at least one (preferably several) of these cues per article is a must.

    August 18, 2012

  • Creative guess but wrong. Mind you, the English word must begin with an "a".

    August 18, 2012

  • Getting close.

    August 18, 2012

  • The Purist Dictionary.

    Madeupical or revitalized Old English forms for words of non-Germanic origin. For all of these terms exists a normal English equivalent beginning with "a" (e.g. "stickstuff" = azote, "daresome = audacious). I wish you a pleasant guessing!

    August 18, 2012

  • A relatively easy (still needs manual work and patience) way to find similar words is to google "allinurl: *fy.com"

    August 18, 2012

  • A list of 999 entries. Add the 1000th!

    August 17, 2012

  • In this area of expertise nouns are frequently used as adjectives (almond, bacon, cider, fennel) or new adjectives are formed (appley, berrylike, citrusy, full-bodied) which are almost never used outside the wine-tasting profession.

    August 17, 2012

  • Yummy...

    August 17, 2012

  • You'll love this...

    August 16, 2012

  • Excellent tool for extracting terms from web-based texts. http://tagcrowd.com/ Easy transfer of txt data into Wordnik lists.

    August 16, 2012

  • Our material environment. Look behind your screen. Name some of the objects you can see there. Try to be as specific as possible. Please participate.

    August 16, 2012

  • There are some repetitions in this list due to additions by users other than the author. As these entries can only be deleted by the contributors themselves, they mercyshevekare kindly requested to review their additions and delete those that are redundant.

    August 16, 2012

  • According to http://home.earthlink.net/~skilton/dictionary.html the definition of asskey:

    "Any keystroke struck in frustration, most typically in an attempt to revive a frozen system. The group secretary could be heard asking Tech Support, "so where's the asskey"?
    (orig. Southern US dial., ASCII)"

    August 16, 2012

  • Thanks, I have checked them out. Nothing is new under the heaven. It seems, though, that the number of nouns formed with -nik is rather limited in English.

    August 15, 2012

  • As for "verbizing" see the word "verbed" on the list http://www.wordnik.com/lists/en---autological-words

    August 14, 2012

  • Bobboy = Bobby, sorry for the misspelling.

    August 13, 2012

  • List of English back-formations: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_back-formations

    August 13, 2012

  • "mink" in Hungarian means: we (regional and social variant)

    August 11, 2012

  • "pina" in Hungarian means: cunt

    August 11, 2012

  • "pech" in Hungarian (and in German) means: bad luck

    August 11, 2012

  • "foci" in Hungarian is the diminutive / popular form of saying "soccer".

    August 11, 2012

  • Cool list. Probably there are a lot more, depending on the definition of "English words" and date of entry into your language. Keep on collecting them, I'll do the same for Hungarian. Thank you for the inspiration.

    August 11, 2012

  • Scandal!

    August 11, 2012

  • This list is an excellent resource if you intend to pursue the rhetoric practice of aureation...

    August 11, 2012

  • I started this list only to discover that there is a very similar list on Wordnik: http://www.wordnik.com/lists/nonce by zeke,
    I decided not to delete mine - parallel channels may direct more ships to the same sea...

    August 11, 2012

  • Cool list! How about chalice + cryptex and the infamous cilice belt (as we know them from 'The Da Vinci Code')?

    August 7, 2012

  • "ma" in Hungaroian means: today

    August 7, 2012

  • "lead" in Hungarian means: to pass on / to give away

    August 7, 2012

  • "here" in Hungarian means: testicle / drone (male bee)

    August 7, 2012

  • "tested" in Hungarian means: your body

    August 7, 2012

  • "versed" in Hungarian means: your poem

    August 7, 2012

  • A very wide category. There are words for possibly several hundred thousand tools in the world's languages (especially in industrial societies). You do not believe it? Try to add at least 10 tool names (think of your workplace, or some manual professions)

    August 7, 2012

  • "iron" in Hungarian means: pencil (especially the one used by carpenters)

    August 7, 2012

  • "nyala" in Hungarian is the obscure past tense of "nyalni" (to lick)

    August 7, 2012

  • "font" in Hungarian means: weaved

    August 7, 2012

  • "ken" in Hungarian means: to spread (by a knife)

    August 7, 2012

  • "old" in Hungarian means: dissolve / solve / release

    August 7, 2012

  • "lent" in Hungarian means: downstairs, below, underneath

    August 7, 2012

  • "pont" in Hungarian means: dot / exactly / just

    August 7, 2012

  • "kent" in Hungarian is the past tense of "kenni" = to spread (by a knife)

    August 7, 2012

  • "ment" in Hungarian means: went

    August 7, 2012

  • "volt" in Hungarian means: was / were

    August 7, 2012

  • "per" in Hungarian means: process, trial, suit

    August 7, 2012

  • "abba" in Hungarian means: in(to) that (one)

    August 7, 2012

  • "fa" in Hungarian means: tree

    August 7, 2012

  • "be" in Hungarian means: inside, in, into

    August 7, 2012

  • "jog" in Hungarian means: law / right

    August 7, 2012

  • HU: "kalandor" (adventurer)

    August 7, 2012

  • HU: "zsebnapoleon" (pocket Napoleon)

    August 7, 2012

  • HU: "a zemberek"

    August 7, 2012

  • In the Internet era people can increasingly do business from home. More and more funny "jobs" emerge. Can you think of more "virtual jobs"?

    August 6, 2012

  • Budgetese - not a sexy topic but a very comprehensive list of words and collocations used in EU circles. Budgeting experts please comment and expand.

    August 6, 2012

  • Thanks, guys. I was afraid this list would bore the hell out of you. I'm happy, it didn't. There are several thousand languages in the world, I'm sure most could offer similar lists. I wonder how many EN words would they cover, all put together, and which languages could offer the most examples? So far words of six letters are the longest I have been able to track down in Hungarian.

    August 4, 2012

  • HU for "Sunday best" is "legjobb ruha", "unneplo ruha" (festive clothing)

    August 1, 2012

  • HU for "chatterbox" is "locsi-fecsi" / "dumagep" / "pletykafeszek"

    August 1, 2012

  • HU for "caveman" is "barlanglako" (cave dweller)

    August 1, 2012

  • HU for "carpetbagger" is "szerencselovag" / "szerencsevadasz" (good luck hunter)

    August 1, 2012

  • HU for "deadpan" is "fapofa" (wooden face)

    August 1, 2012

  • "van" in Hungarian means: there is

    August 1, 2012

  • "pad" in Hungarian means: bench / desk

    August 1, 2012

  • "lop" in Hungarian means: to steal

    August 1, 2012

  • "hit" in Hungarian means: faith, belief

    August 1, 2012

  • "has" in Hungarian means: belly, tommy

    August 1, 2012

  • "had" in Hungarian means: army

    August 1, 2012

  • "fog" in Hungarian means: take / tooth / shall - and is, therefore, a homograph in its own right already in that language

    August 1, 2012

  • "arc" in Hungarian means: face

    August 1, 2012

  • "vet" in Hungarian means: to sow

    August 1, 2012

  • Words and collocations associated with political scandal

    August 1, 2012

  • The (funny) HU term for "garburator" is "konyhamalac" (kitchen pig)

    August 1, 2012

  • "part" in Hungarian means: (river) bank / (sea) shore

    August 1, 2012

  • "petit" "Petit" in Hungarian means: Pete (him)

    August 1, 2012

  • "pata" in Hungarian means: hoof

    August 1, 2012

  • "muti" in Hungarian means: show me

    August 1, 2012

  • "Anya" "anya" in Hungarian means: mother

    August 1, 2012

  • "soma" i.e. "Soma" is a male first name in Hungarian

    August 1, 2012

  • "eke" in Hungarian means: yoke

    August 1, 2012

  • "banya" in Hungarian means: witch / ugly old woman

    August 1, 2012

  • "tan" in Hungarian means: teaching / -logy

    August 1, 2012

  • "kin" in Hungarian means: on/of/about who(m)

    August 1, 2012

  • "bent" in Hungarian means: inside

    August 1, 2012

  • "barack" in Hungarian means: peach / apricot

    August 1, 2012

  • "kit" in Hungarian means: who(m)

    August 1, 2012

  • "comb" in Hungarian means: thigh

    August 1, 2012

  • "far" in Hungarian means: hind / behind / buttocks

    August 1, 2012

  • Another way of saying "Zugszwang" in German is "Zeitnot". Both words come from chess and mean more or less the same (two synonymous aspects of the same phenomenon). Zeitnot is also making its way into English.

    August 1, 2012

  • Superb list! It's a shame the loading (and even the scrolling) of bigger lists is so slow in Wordnik. Though in today's world 9000 is closer to zero than to anything that might be called big. What if Wordnik (if a user agrees) allowed the opening of (especially) long lists in txt-format without the "was added etc." information in each line?

    August 1, 2012

  • "bolt" in Hungarian means: shop / store

    August 1, 2012

  • "tag" in Hungarian means: member

    August 1, 2012

  • "eleven" in Hungarian means: lively

    August 1, 2012

  • "hat" in Hungarian means: six

    August 1, 2012

  • "ember" in Hungarian means: human

    August 1, 2012

  • "Barack" in Hungarian means: peach / apricot

    August 1, 2012

  • Please help me extend this list. The idea being "as seen from abroad".

    August 1, 2012

  • HU = konyhamalac (kitchenpig)

    August 1, 2012

  • An ultimately purposeless but dramatically different list...

    August 1, 2012

  • A (these days usually on-line) tool that helps you rewrite, reword articles you have written either manually or automatically, using a synonym database

    July 31, 2012

  • If you look for more waterborne species (other than just mammals) go to: http://www.wordnik.com/lists/pech---marine-species'>http://www.wordnik.com/lists/pech---marine-species

    July 31, 2012

  • For more cold and slimy creatures consult http://www.wordnik.com/lists/pech---marine-species'>http://www.wordnik.com/lists/pech---marine-species

    July 31, 2012

  • Cool. It would be great to see all tags and edit them.

    July 31, 2012

  • Thank you marky, and sorry about that. I just changed the list's "edit" property to "editable by anyone".

    July 31, 2012

  • Word or letter combinations, clicking on which (under "tagging") you'll get long (and easily copiable txt) lists as a result. Please add more tags (of your own) that generate lists of considerable size.

    July 31, 2012

  • Interpreters love to comment on speakers and their speeches. I want to grow this list of adjectives to several hundreds. Please add yours.

    July 31, 2012

  • An extensive list I have been working on for quite some time. Feel free to add more of the kind if you miss any.

    July 31, 2012

  • Names of heavy / black / thrash / sludge / speed / death / glam metal + thrashcore bands + some basic vocabulary. There is a naming contest going on between Hell and Heaven.

    July 25, 2012

  • Names of progressive / art / psychedelic / baroque rock bands. Non-Anglo-Saxon bands of supernational fame are also listed as long as their name is English.

    July 25, 2012

  • A Wordle list showing the frequency of each adjective and headword respectively: http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/5512194/Marine_species

    July 19, 2012

  • HU = (bika)töke, (kakas)töke

    July 19, 2012

  • Mind you: once you have "fied" a noun into a verb, back "fication" should also be possible, in principle. Songification, slangification, etc. Only native speakers could tell if this goes well with each example in the list. Please comment, if you are one.

    July 19, 2012

  • HU = szajszarazsag

    July 19, 2012

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