Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A deep red, translucent variety of the mineral corundum, highly valued as a precious stone.
  • n. Something, such as a watch bearing, that is made from a ruby.
  • n. A dark or deep red to deep purplish red.
  • adj. Of the color ruby.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A clear, deep, red variety of corundum, valued as a precious stone.
  • n. A deep red colour.
  • n. Type having a height of 5.5 points.
  • n. A ruby hummer, a South American hummingbird, Clytolaema rubricauda.
  • n. A red bird-of-paradise, Paradisaea rubra.
  • adj. Of a deep red colour (having any of numerous bright colours reminiscent of the colour of blood or cherries or tomatoes).
  • v. To make red; to redden.
  • n. A pronunciation guide written above or beside Chinese or Japanese characters.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Ruby-colored; red.
  • n. A precious stone of a carmine red color, sometimes verging to violet, or intermediate between carmine and hyacinth red. It is a red crystallized variety of corundum.
  • n. The color of a ruby; carmine red; a red tint.
  • n. That which has the color of the ruby, as red wine. Hence, a red blain or carbuncle.
  • n. See Agate, n., 2.
  • n. Any species of South American humming birds of the genus Clytolæma. The males have a ruby-colored throat or breast.
  • transitive v. To make red; to redden.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The clear rich-red variety of corundum. (See corundum.)
  • n. A pure or somewhat crimson red color.
  • n. Something resembling a ruby; a blain; a blotch; a carbuncle.
  • n. In heraldry, the tincture red or gules, when blazoning is done by means of precious stones. See blazon, n., 2.
  • n. In printing, a type smaller than nonpareil and larger than pearl, about the size of American agate, or 5½ points in the new system of sizes.
  • n. In horology: Any variety of ruby used as jewels in watchmaking, as in the finest watches. Hence—
  • n. The jewel of the roller of the balance-staff of a watch, irrespective of the material of which it is made. Compare jewel, n., 4.
  • n. In ornithology: The red bird of paradise, Paradisea rubra or sanguinea.
  • n. The ruby hummer, Clytolæma rubineus of Brazil, and some related humming-birds with ruby gorget.
  • Of a color resembling that of the ruby; of a rich red color inclining toward crimson.
  • To make red.
  • n. In 1887, M. Frémy, with the aid of his preparateur, M. Verneuil, undertook new experiments on the crystallization of alumina, and had the satisfaction of obtaining very beautiful artificial rubies. Now M. Verneuil, today professor at the Museum, has discovered the method of producing the ruby artificially by melting a mixture of alumina and oxide of chrome at a constant temperature of several thousands of degrees, and in layers superposed from the outside to the inside, in order to prevent the production of cracks in the crystalline mass. This eminent chemist has succeeded in creating a magnificent ruby, weighing about 2,500 grams, and having a commercial value of about 3,000 francs. …
  • n. The deepest red topaz which owes its color to heating, to the right degree, of the yellow Brazilian topaz. Further heating turns it pink, and still continued heating renders it colorless. See topaz.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a deep and vivid red color
  • n. a transparent deep red variety of corundum; used as a gemstone and in lasers
  • n. a transparent piece of ruby that has been cut and polished and is valued as a precious gem
  • adj. of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French rubi, from Medieval Latin rubīnus (lapis), red (stone), ruby, from Latin rubeus, red; see reudh- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin rubeus (red). (Wiktionary)
From the British 5.5-point font Ruby, used for annotations in printed documents. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I think he covered the motivation and implementation details of what we call ruby-ng. eclass pretty well, so I'll try to give a little end-user info.

    Planet Gentoo

  • If ‘going-to-church’ had any meaning and effect upon me as a child, it was the glitter of gold and silver chalices; the sheen of sacred vestments, vigil candles flickering in ruby light; stained glass windows romancing the morning and evening light; the blue of the statuesque Blessed Virgin and blood-red robe of Christ, the Sacred Heart arm and hand outstretched to the multitudes; statues draped in purple during Lent.

    norbert blei | six found-poems in the words and paintings of andrew wyeth « poetry dispatch & other notes from the underground

  • The ruby is supposed by Moslems to be a common mineral thoroughly

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • I spent the first year at Bell writing a paper reviewing the current status of x-ray microscopy and started an experiment on energy transfer in ruby with Hyatt Gibbs and Sam McCall.

    Steven Chu - Autobiography

  • On the fourth night after he received the cut ruby from the Dutch lapidaries, Paternostro was murdered and the gem stolen from his apartments in Hatton Gardens.

    The Paternoster Ruby

  • Tale: snake-stone ruby is put into a box for twelve years and turns into hero.

    Tales of the Punjab

  • The tufted convallaria bifolia, or bead-ruby, is one of our most common wood plants, very much like that of Europe, although the flowerets are larger.

    Rural Hours

  • For example, the command rpm ­qa | grep ­i ruby queries Linux to display the names of all installed packages, and displays any names containing the word ruby (ignoring upper­ versus lower­case).

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • John Radavsky will be the featured performer, singing songs with the word ruby in them.

    The Daily Sentinel: News

  • Well, here’s a hash in ruby (the day job), which is how I’d generally pass some simple data from A to B without needing to constrain it to a declared interface/class/etc.

    Scripting News for 12/20/2006 « Scripting News Annex

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