Comments by hernesheir

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  • The five precisely spaced dots in this word's i's spell E-S-E in Morse code.

    February 17, 2013

  • The discussion thread below brings the terms despecificate and adsignification to mind.

    February 17, 2013

  • I like the flavor of pit-roasted pork. I wouldn't recommend cinder pig though. Too metallic-tasting.

    February 17, 2013

  • From the Same Context heading: any ill-satisfied plaguey uppish tea-drinker, and, praise those thermopower weapons.

    February 17, 2013

  • Cover your right eye and read to me the third line of letters please.

    February 16, 2013

  • To cast cavells -- to cast lots. Northumberland dialect.

    February 16, 2013

  • brozier

    February 16, 2013

  • brosier

    February 16, 2013

  • Compare glasschord.

    February 16, 2013

  • Compare glasschord.

    February 16, 2013

  • Percussive cousin of Benjamin Franklin's glass harmonica. Cf. crystallophone.

    February 16, 2013

  • *ssch: glasschord, which see.

    February 16, 2013

  • Then would you insist as well that anthropologists' field-recordings should be relegated to the dung-heap and debitage of disallowed/disavowed data?

    February 15, 2013

  • It's a golf club. With a neck like a duck.

    February 15, 2013

  • Better a fraught than a draught, of moonshine, I always say.
    fraught - two bucketsful. --from the definitions.

    February 15, 2013

  • A feast; entertainment.

    February 15, 2013

  • It's a plant. The pieces of it's name have an interesting (to me) derivation.

    February 15, 2013

  • A hawk's or falcon's dropping which squirts at an angle other than vertical. --from the definitions.

    February 15, 2013

  • It's a particular fish, in bilby-land.
    rock-whiting

    February 15, 2013

  • Known as a croaker sack in the deep south of the US; the burlap bag used by frog-giggers to contain and keep their middle-of-the-night catches damp.

    February 14, 2013

  • See pot-hat.

    February 14, 2013

  • List of most expensive divorces.

    February 14, 2013

  • List of Hawaii tornados.

    February 14, 2013

  • Goes in the same toolbox as your oyster-hammer.

    February 14, 2013

  • "They counte Peace to be cause of ydelnes, and that it maketh
    men hodipekes and cowardes.
    "--Bp. Christopherson, _Exh. ag.
    Rebel._ 1554. The Rebel was a poem, printed in Notes and Querries: A Medium of Communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc., No. 33, Saturday, June 15, 1850, p. 34.

    February 14, 2013

  • A certain alga growing on stones that, when wetted, yields a strong and pleasant odor of violets. Perfect for lining a grotto or outdoor shower, I should think.

    February 13, 2013

  • How do you solve a problem like Maria?

    February 13, 2013

  • I once purchased a bottle of orange-water perfume at a Cuban tienda in Tampa FL.

    February 13, 2013

  • The storied swamp-cypress of Mexico.

    February 13, 2013

  • Interesting, if not zblbl, because water-cooler is African ungulate herd-slang for the water-hole, where hackers (slang for crocodiles) lie in wait to ambush the users.

    February 13, 2013

  • Compare staddle.

    February 13, 2013

  • Here, Wiki.

    February 13, 2013

  • An inverted umbrella device deployed beneath an olive tree that catches olives shaken from it during harvesting.

    February 13, 2013

  • An olive-harvesting tool.

    February 13, 2013

  • Primarily looking for the edible kind, and associated words, ruzuzu, but I'd be pleased if you'd add it anyway! It should probably go on my list of "greens", too.

    February 12, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    February 12, 2013

  • It's a tree.

    February 12, 2013

  • Therefore, non habemus papam.

    February 12, 2013

  • anagogical

    February 12, 2013

  • Kaboom.

    February 12, 2013

  • Frayed bits of dental-floss lodged inextricably between the teeth.

    February 12, 2013

  • sarceled. Pig butchery seems to dominate the visuals provided.

    February 12, 2013

  • I like the term aide-mémoire.

    February 12, 2013

  • My favorites so far are powfagged, cubdrawn, and forswonk.

    February 12, 2013

  • And aholehole repeats four letters and makes it a whole fish.

    February 12, 2013

  • added buckling.

    February 11, 2013

  • Wh-what?

    February 11, 2013

  • “I really love the doner kabob at my local Turkish restaurant, and the cacik is awesome, pronounced "jawjeek" phonetically.” --from the examples.

    I'll go with the cacik. Or tzatziki, if it's available.

    February 11, 2013

  • Or glassphalt, for the more body-conscious.

    February 11, 2013

  • See peaberry.

    February 11, 2013

  • See andromeda.

    February 11, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    February 11, 2013

  • *ndsp sandspout.

    February 10, 2013

  • It's a bird.

    February 10, 2013

  • Why isn't the media reporting this threat to world security? Who is behind the conspiracy? Why has the White House been silent on this issue?

    February 10, 2013

  • James Cook named the Sandwich Islands after his benefactor, John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. Cook reported that the native name for the Islands we now know as Hawai'i was Owyhee. The so-named county in SW Idaho is derived from Cook's term, and recalls 3 Hawaiian trappers who were lost in that region.

    Visuals are fairly representative of this part of Idaho.

    February 10, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    February 10, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    February 10, 2013

  • Charming definition, to which should be appended "while sipping mojitos from a cruise ship deckchair".

    February 10, 2013

  • *loved*

    February 10, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    February 10, 2013

  • pelele

    February 10, 2013

  • Thundersnow thunders now in New England's 2/8/2012 blizzard.

    February 9, 2013

  • One for those who list the winds of the world.

    February 9, 2013

  • Compare German Kiste.

    February 8, 2013

  • A place at which to shop for others' former spouses.

    February 8, 2013

  • My father sometimes uses this term for outhouse.

    February 8, 2013

  • A pantry, but for vin.

    February 8, 2013

  • *rkwr arkwright

    February 8, 2013

  • Cf. humidor.

    February 8, 2013

  • “He is aflame, from the edge of his collar -- a patent clerical guillotine of washable xylonite, purchased at a famous travellers 'emporium in the Strand -- to the thin, silky rings of dark hair that are wearing from his high, pale temples.” --Richard Dehan, The Dop Doctor. London, Wm. Heinemann Ltd., 1910.

    February 8, 2013

  • Cf. galalith and ivoroid.

    February 8, 2013

  • Just lovely, qroqqa!

    February 8, 2013

  • Get thee to a peachery, ma chérie.

    February 8, 2013

  • A grovecrop of Ailanthus (Tree of Heaven) trees.

    February 8, 2013

  • Great job ruzuzu. Who goes next?

    February 8, 2013

  • How about rotten pears?

    February 7, 2013

  • Don't name your daughter mydaleine.
    There is a herring connection, ruzuzu!

    February 7, 2013

  • Sounds like a fancy air filter, ruzuzu.

    February 7, 2013

  • Is bandie a nickname for bandicoot, bilby?

    February 7, 2013

  • T.S. Eliot was imp of the purr-verse in his work Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.

    February 7, 2013

  • The offal of pilchards.

    February 7, 2013

  • One of the tonsils. --from the definitions.

    February 7, 2013

  • Very moony.

    February 7, 2013

  • Get thee to a minkery, minx.

    February 7, 2013

  • I think of two things when I see this word: (1), a Bavarian tourist shop full of cuckoo clocks, the ticks, tocks and cuckoos all competing with eachother; (2) the diner in Gainesville FL named "The Clock" that has dozens of clocks on the walls, none of them telling the correct time.

    February 7, 2013

  • A boat.

    February 7, 2013

  • Cf. stater.

    February 7, 2013

  • One for the coin listers.

    February 7, 2013

  • Just added tanekaha as an obliquely-related term.

    February 7, 2013

  • You're welcome, friend. Thank you in return.

    February 7, 2013

  • Something for a nemophilist to get lost in.

    February 7, 2013

  • Nice list! Many of these terms would apply to the poets and their works as well.

    February 7, 2013

  • Methinks this word is missing a "p".

    February 7, 2013

  • I'm an adjective you don't meet every day.

    February 7, 2013

  • Just added sugar-teat.

    February 7, 2013

  • A red wine from Bordeaux.

    February 7, 2013

  • A white wine grown near Napoli.

    February 7, 2013

  • A local French red wine, from the village of that name.

    February 7, 2013

  • A type of red wine.

    February 7, 2013

  • An Italian wine that incorporates aspirin so you won't get headache.

    February 7, 2013

  • Another varietal wine, for the oenology listers.

    February 7, 2013

  • A shout-out to, well, you know who you are. Each of you.

    February 7, 2013

  • See citation at prayer flag.

    February 7, 2013

  • A variety of Italian wine grape; one for Wordnik's oenology listers.

    February 7, 2013

  • Whilst I slept ruzuzu guessed the answer: causa mortis. Congrats ruzuzu. Thanks for playing and trying and trying fbharjo.

    February 7, 2013

  • Not there yet...

    February 7, 2013

  • A small gooseberry pie. --from the definitions.

    February 7, 2013

  • Etymology and word roots at the bottom of the page....

    February 7, 2013

  • It's a fish. haddock

    February 7, 2013

  • It's a fish, too.

    February 7, 2013

  • It's called a puffin, too.

    February 7, 2013

  • fbharjo, just a straightforward first-letters anagram. The terms themselves fall within a broad rubric that also encompasses the looked-for word/phrase.

    February 7, 2013

  • Not quite, @ry! Thanks for your indulgence!

    February 7, 2013

  • A morbid species of phlegm.

    February 7, 2013

  • This derogatory term has been re-purposed several times.

    February 7, 2013

  • Nice, bilby. Thanks!

    February 6, 2013

  • This list is a little word game. Welcome.

    February 6, 2013

  • I wish I were on a plane to the Solomon Islands today to observe life after the 90cm tsunami that resulted from the 8.0 earthquake.

    February 6, 2013

  • This would look nice on my tombstone, right after fiddler.

    February 6, 2013

  • A tree-stand from which to ambush a tiger. Unless Tiger got there first and is waiting in the tree.

    February 6, 2013

  • A deus ex machina hydraulica, for one?

    February 6, 2013

  • Could I get a neck massage too?

    February 6, 2013

  • See definitions at microtaggant, taggant.

    February 6, 2013

  • *rchd archdapifer

    February 6, 2013

  • One for the coin and currency listers.

    February 6, 2013

  • See the better definition at rapakiwi.

    February 6, 2013

  • scratch cradle, cat's cradle.

    February 6, 2013

  • A term coined by Seattle food expert Jon Rowley to describe the combination of subtle local variations in underwater environments that affect the flavor of Pacific oysters and other seafoods. Cf. terroir.

    February 6, 2013

  • Worn inside a Hessian, perhaps?

    February 6, 2013

  • Placerville CA was called Hangtown in those days, as were others, I suppose.
    I remember seeing a scarecrow-like effigy in miner's clothing hanging from an old downtown building in the 1980's.

    February 6, 2013

  • (Mind where you place the hyphen.)

    February 6, 2013

  • The art of making handles.

    February 6, 2013

  • A nice illustration and nicer animation of the Witch of Agnesi are given at its Wikipedia citation, which see.

    February 5, 2013

  • The maths term semicontinuum and its definition seems appropriate here, in a tangential way.

    February 5, 2013

  • "It's no skin off my nose."

    February 5, 2013

  • A bumped-up birthrate.

    February 5, 2013

  • "Bartender! Another rum shrub for my landscaper friend!"

    February 5, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    February 5, 2013

  • Contrast willow-garden.

    February 5, 2013

  • See Richard III.

    February 5, 2013

  • The king under the car park. BBC World News, 2/5/2013.

    February 5, 2013

  • It's also a palindrome, says Wordnik.

    February 5, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    February 4, 2013

  • This bivalve may be successfully opened with an oyster-hammer.

    February 4, 2013

  • For performing more intricate work than may be accomplished by an oyster-sledgehammer.

    February 4, 2013

  • Cf. paillette, papilette.

    February 4, 2013

  • Skookumchuck Creek is a tributary of the Salmon River in Idaho.

    February 4, 2013

  • *nthr unthrive

    February 4, 2013

  • Full enough, and a pain to page down to to add a word....

    February 4, 2013

  • Like a beard-hater. Really.

    February 3, 2013

  • Fear of catsharks? Cf. selachophobia.

    February 3, 2013

  • Cf. broth of a boy.

    February 3, 2013

  • Po-Te-N-Ti-Al (polonium, tellurium, nitrogen, thallium, aluminium).

    February 3, 2013

  • Just thought you'd like to know, it's neither radish nor radicchio.

    February 3, 2013

  • Don't know if wire lettuce's time has come, but in the season between the muddy winter thaw and the ripening of foxtail and June grasses (whose prickly awned fruits cling and burrow mercilessly into pantlegs, bootlaces, and stockings), I enjoy tramping the remote and desolate hills and dry treeless vales of Malheur County Oregon.

    February 3, 2013

  • The bles'séd Wiktionary definition of zanzibug employ's the pos's'es's'ive *mosquito's* us'ed, deplorably, a's a plural.

    February 3, 2013

  • Sc-H-I-Sm (scandium, hydrogen, iodine, samarium).

    February 3, 2013

  • I never looked at this phrase, and don't recall making this comment.

    February 3, 2013

  • Great Jumping Frenchmen with their miryachit affections!

    February 3, 2013

  • It's all free. And fun. And useful!

    February 3, 2013

  • *tchg matchgate

    February 3, 2013

  • Just added game-hole.

    February 3, 2013

  • Po - I (polonium, iodine). And to some, that's what poi tastes like.

    February 2, 2013

  • F -O - N - K (fluorine, oxygen, nitrogen, potassium).

    February 2, 2013

  • Better bistered than blistered.

    February 2, 2013

  • Rhymes with robot.

    February 2, 2013

  • Cockaigne, for an example from the Middle Ages.

    February 2, 2013

  • Definitions include a URL and an ISBN. And references to Australia, bilby.

    February 2, 2013

  • Added C. elegans to the list.

    February 2, 2013

  • bêche-de-mer

    February 2, 2013

  • Just added bitumen and coal tar. Oh, and radium too.

    February 2, 2013

  • I'm imagining the softly glowing pearly sausages mentioned in the quotation below.

    February 1, 2013

  • It's a moderate tree.

    February 1, 2013

  • Pus in your pupik. Or an onion. U pick.

    February 1, 2013

  • Nice visuals.

    February 1, 2013

  • Well I'll bejiggered.

    February 1, 2013

  • I always wondered about those pigeon-fanciers.

    February 1, 2013

  • Vanuatu pidgin, for one.

    February 1, 2013

  • An old term for ram, a male sheep.

    February 1, 2013

  • Rhymes with doggerel.

    February 1, 2013

  • One for the coin listers. Compare rose-rial.

    February 1, 2013

  • Eels were sold by the stick in old England. 25 eels to the stick.

    February 1, 2013

  • In my rock-climbing days we called obvious and protruding hand-sized rocks and knobs that even a non-climber could employ as a handhold chicken heads. We didn't have a comparable ice term for our ice-climbing of frozen waterfalls and curtains of ice on cliff faces.

    February 1, 2013

  • *ftst toftstead

    February 1, 2013

  • A two-year old ewe. Compare hoggaster, hoggerel, hog.

    February 1, 2013

  • Not to be confused with the various trees and woods called bloodwood.

    January 31, 2013

  • lollardism

    January 31, 2013

  • grudgings

    January 31, 2013

  • A mixture of oats, peas, and vetches.

    January 31, 2013

  • From Old Norse bygg; Middle English big, bigge: barley.

    January 31, 2013

  • Armless is harmless, Texas.

    January 31, 2013

  • I think of verjuice and crabstick.

    January 31, 2013

  • A species of itch that some people cannot resist scratching.

    January 31, 2013

  • Words, figuratively seeds of ideas. The abdelavi is a type of melon from Arabia and North Africa.

    January 31, 2013

  • mashriq

    January 31, 2013

  • One for the bladed weapons listers.

    January 31, 2013

  • Another for the coin listers.

    January 31, 2013

  • Another for the gums and resins listers.

    January 31, 2013

  • yamani

    January 31, 2013

  • Another one for the coin listers.

    January 31, 2013

  • One for the coin and currency listers.

    January 31, 2013

  • One for the coin listers.

    January 31, 2013

  • Duly noted: the species epithet, raetam is an anagram of the generic name, Retama.

    January 31, 2013

  • Rhymes with Derp.

    January 31, 2013

  • One for the gums and resins listers.

    January 31, 2013

  • One for those who list all things nautical.

    January 31, 2013

  • See examples for grass crown.

    January 30, 2013


  • --Arthur George Liddon Rogers, ed. A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Clarendon Press, 1887, p.313.

    January 30, 2013

  • Shetland Islands: The water which flows from a dunghill.

    January 30, 2013

  • *nthr wanthrift

    January 30, 2013

  • Armless is harmless, Texas.

    January 30, 2013

  • One for the fabric listers.

    January 30, 2013

  • Scots. Two slices of oat bread, buttered and laid face-to-face.

    January 30, 2013

  • Hispalis - (Seville)

    January 30, 2013


  • -- A History of Agriculture and Prices in England from the Year after the Oxford Parliament (1259) to the Commencement of the Continental War (1793), Arthur George Liddon Rogers, ed., 1887, p.749.

    January 30, 2013

  • Ruthenia, Rus?

    January 30, 2013

  • See jarp. Also termed egg-tapping, egg fight, egg knocking, shackling, dumping. All the King's horses and all the King's men... From the folk who gave us conkers.

    January 30, 2013

  • One for the weapons listers.

    January 30, 2013

  • Another one for the hat-listers.

    January 30, 2013

  • One for the hat-listers.

    January 30, 2013

  • One for the coin and currency listers.

    January 30, 2013

  • involucrum cadaverale

    January 30, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase Supreme Court of the United States. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p.317.

    January 30, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    January 30, 2013

  • It's a fish.

    January 30, 2013

  • New England: A dessert made by stewing fruit topped with pieces of biscuit dough, which steam as the fruit cooks.

    January 30, 2013

  • Hum + buzz.

    January 29, 2013

  • Mutters and murmurs.

    January 29, 2013

  • I like my toads fire-bellied and spade-footed. A knot of toads is a little overwhelming, however.

    January 29, 2013

  • In entomology, the act of ejecting a pungent fluid from the anus, with a slight noise.

    January 29, 2013

  • I like how the oddly palindromic string *bbubb just sits there like a blunt toad in this word..

    January 29, 2013

  • Better leather-lunged than leather-lipped? You pick.

    January 29, 2013

  • Talk, cackle.

    January 29, 2013

  • The American night-heron; quawk.

    January 29, 2013

  • caterwaul

    January 29, 2013

  • This lidded movable names that which it is intended to safely contain.

    January 29, 2013

  • A homographic homophonic autoantonym that means to silence, or to make a (squishy) sound.

    January 29, 2013

  • My favorites so far are tin cry and croyn.

    January 29, 2013

  • Thanks for tagging, ruzuzu!

    January 29, 2013

  • One of the common names of the copperhead snake. chunkhead

    January 28, 2013

  • Common name of a pit viper of Mexico and Central America known also as the Mexican moccasin. Genus Agkistrodon.

    January 28, 2013

  • Trinidadian common name for the anaconda.

    January 28, 2013

  • A Brazilian name for the mythical giant anaconda.
    From Old Tupi mbói.

    January 28, 2013

  • Snakes of the genus Aparallactus are called centipede-eaters.

    January 28, 2013

  • I'm an adjective you don't meet every day.

    January 28, 2013

  • hot-headed

    January 28, 2013

  • A marine fuflun. Hands a few to ruzuzu with a long-handled dipnet.

    January 28, 2013

  • Janet's method occurs in a list of similar medical eponyms.

    January 28, 2013

  • *pspl sheepsplit

    January 28, 2013

  • God's bodkin

    January 28, 2013

  • Plural of anticlinorium; anticlines.

    January 27, 2013

  • Zing went the strings.

    January 27, 2013

  • Same context: stunting boorishness.

    January 27, 2013

  • Sporty.

    January 26, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "How soon can you obtain the information?" --US Railroad Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 26, 2013

  • As fat as mud; very fat: as, “veal, mud-fat and tender as a chicken, worth a shilling a pound,” --Century Dictionary & Cyclopedia

    January 25, 2013

  • Embroidery, especially embroidery upon muslin.

    January 25, 2013

  • a caramelized pancake similar to a Dutch Baby, but

    January 25, 2013

  • This is how my mother says it.

    January 25, 2013

  • In Náhuatl: péyotl.

    January 24, 2013

  • It's a bird.

    January 24, 2013

  • Construction of a different sort of "new one".

    January 24, 2013

  • One for ruzuzu's list of Panvocalic Pants. Each of the vowels occurs but once; in this case alphabetically. The definition given for tackle twill has etymological/provenance information. This fabric type does not yet appear on any of the Wordnik fabric lists.

    January 24, 2013

  • Ice-eckle.

    January 24, 2013

  • I knew you'd find3 your squirrels3 list.

    January 24, 2013

  • A place in which to think outside the box.

    January 24, 2013

  • kadilesker, fool-killer.

    January 24, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "What is the rate of increase?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 24, 2013

  • "What importance do they attach to?", in the odd shorthand of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 24, 2013

  • Railway telegraphy term meaning "Of no importance". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 23, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' term meaning "You are wanted at home". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p.268.

    January 23, 2013

  • Sure, ry, those are all great. One would think the top of the list would be duct tape, the handy-man's secret weapon.

    January 23, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Not a holiday". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 23, 2013

  • Cerberus ate my homework.

    January 23, 2013

  • This word belongs in the Wordnik lists of imagined places and destinaitons.

    January 23, 2013

  • It's a bird. See jake.

    January 23, 2013

  • Yes, one for the list. Because the visuals move me.

    January 23, 2013

  • For drying gunpowder granules. Kind of like toasting sesame seeds or kasha. When you get it too hot it becomes a Kaboom!-stove.

    January 23, 2013

  • "Cannot give guarantee required", in the shorthand notation of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' term for the phrase "Will furnish funds for immediate expenses". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. I wish someone would front me funds for a long and distant fly-fishing trip.

    January 22, 2013

  • Cinematic is right. In black and white.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Can a fund be provided for?, in the terse shorthand of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "Get freight off as soon as possible". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "Following goods have been forwarded". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    For the bird nickname felfit, see also fieldfare.

    January 22, 2013

  • In the language of railroad telegraphs, "What will you forward?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Not doing a good business". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • In the abbreviated jargon of railroad telegraphy, faceguard stood for the phrase "Failure cannot be prevented". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "Cannot explain by wire; await letter". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Thanks marky for vibrationally!

    January 22, 2013

  • Plough Monday

    January 22, 2013

  • Railway telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Why has no explanation been made?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "This expense should be discontinued at once". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. Railroad telegraph shorthand.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' abbreviated jargon meaning "Will shippers bear expense of cooperage?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.
    ethicist

    January 22, 2013

  • "What are the expectations?", in the shorthand of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraph shorthand for "Will report as soon as examination is completed". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Have you any evidence?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Will engine require coal?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Engine off the track". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Engine is completely broken down". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "We have booked all the tonnage at present prices that we can take care of". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Reduction of force", in the shorthand of railroad telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers used eidolon as shorthand for the phrase "On account of _____, until further advised, we cannot accept _____ for points on the". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Until an additional effort is made", in the shorthand of railroad telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' terse jargon for the phrase "will have the same effect". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "What has caused the decrease in earnings?", in the shorthand of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p.217.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "Send all duplicates".US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "Draft not properly endorsed; send duplicate or second with proper endorsement". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Why has draft not been honored?, in the abbreviated jargon of the railroad telegrapher. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' code for the phrase "Refuses to surrender documents. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: Railway telegraphers' shorthand for "Try to secure the documents".

    January 22, 2013

  • "Documents must be sent with draft". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Cannot do it without", in the shorthand jargon of railroad telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p.205.

    January 22, 2013

  • In the terse language of railway telegraphers, dragonwort stood for the phrase "Has dividend been cleared?" - US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Expect to have difficulty", in the shorthand of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p.195.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "What does the difference amount to?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • This list makes me smile.

    January 22, 2013

  • A stack of sail; a substantial deployment of a sailing ship's canvas. Or something like that.

    January 22, 2013

  • proil

    January 22, 2013

  • Don't get left in the lurch!

    January 22, 2013

  • Don't worry, it was a gunsmith's tool.

    January 22, 2013

  • Put some of this in your tobacco pipe.

    January 22, 2013

  • Why not ton-belly?

    January 22, 2013

  • List this term in the good -isms column.

    January 22, 2013

  • cire perdue

    January 22, 2013

  • "Will not deliver", in the jargon of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Explain fully and quickly cause of delay". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "Is their any special reason for declining?" in the jargon of telegraphic railroad communications. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "What is the total amount of debit? --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 22, 2013

  • "6:15 p.m. today" in the terse coded jargon of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p. 177.

    January 22, 2013

  • Next comes smelting, then guns.

    January 22, 2013

  • And dinar = 6:15 p.m. today.

    January 21, 2013

  • All these railroad telegraph terms are genuine. Odd, but genuine.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraph shorthand notation meaning "10:45 p.m. yesterday." --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p. 177.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "3:30 a.m. to-morrow. US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906, p.176.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Time stated is too short". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: "Have plenty of time". See dandy-cock.

    January 21, 2013

  • CD&C defines the term as hurtfulness. To railroad telegraphers, damnosity meant "day after to-morrow". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Any day next week (except)". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Damage has not been repaired". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Freight damaged by water from leaky roof". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "In what respect is the freight damaged?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' code for the phrase "in anticipation of a small crop". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Crop largest on record", in railroad telegraphers' terms. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Will not need wrecking crew(s)" in the shorthand code of railway telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • creation!

    January 21, 2013

  • "For what amount shall we open credit?", in the abrupt notation of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Your course is approved". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' term meaning cost, duty, and all commissions. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' notation meaning "Not on account of contract". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. What? we didn't order a crocodile. Who put that in the boxcar?

    January 21, 2013

  • "Cannot contract yet; market too excited". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Subject to regular contract conditions". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Contract must be cancelled", in the terse language of railroad telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Can contract on terms proposed if you will authorize me to". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • A nickname for the puffin. In the abbreviated jargon of railway telegraphers, coulterneb signified the phrase "Consignee will agree to". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railway telegraphers' shorthand for "You have our consent". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers used the word corpulent to signify the phrase "Can you obtain written consent?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • In the abrupt jargon of railroad telegraphy, cornball stood for the phrase "will not be confirmed". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railway telegraphers' jargon meaning "Whom shall we confer with?". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "No change in conditions".

    January 21, 2013

  • "We accept conditions proposed". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphy shorthand for the phrase "Shipment delivered in good order without exception". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "Advise if _____ stock has arrived; If so, what is condition?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Will not make any concession". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. Compare conjugal.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Must make a concession of at least" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. compare connubial.

    January 21, 2013

  • "What do you advise in reference to the complaint?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: The term concertina stood for the phrase "There is no competition" in the language of railroad telegraphers.

    January 21, 2013

  • The word complect stood for the interrogative "Who are the principal competitors?" in the abbreviated jargon of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. The word concertina was one answer to this question.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railway telegraphers' shorthand for the phrase "Minimum weight _____ pounds each". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. Yours is a little on the heavy side, by the way.

    January 21, 2013

  • In railroad telegraphers' shorthand, communist stood for the phrase "knocked down flat in bundles. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. Crushed fascicles ==> fascists?

    January 21, 2013

  • "No commission has been paid". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • In the language of railroad telegraphy, comedown stood for "Do not pay any commission". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. Bummer, dude.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Cannot allow commission". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • In the abbreviated shorthand of the railway telegrapher, colon meant "Cost, insurance and commission". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • In the shorthand of railway telegraphers, collard stood for the phrase "What are commissions, costs and charges?"

    January 21, 2013

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: "When shall we commence?"

    January 21, 2013

  • "The passenger department will make proper collections", in the jargon of railway telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • To a railroad telegrapher, cobstone meant "Have closed in accordance with terms agreed upon. Confirm at once". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • In railroad telegraphers' shorthand, clotpate meant "Will not settle the claim unless". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Claim has been received; will have prompt attention", in railroad telegraphers' abbreviated shorthand. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • In railway telegraphy, circumvent stood for the phrase "Is claimant willing to accept a less sum than the full claim in settlement?" --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • This word meant "Cannot be had under any circumstances" in the abbreviated jargon of railroad telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand meaning "Charges have not been guaranteed". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Property described above is being held for payment of charges at _____", in railroad telegraphers' shorthand. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • An outdated article of women's undergarments. In the abbreviated communications of railroad telegraphy, chemiloon meant "Do not change". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Change of line", in railway telegraphers' shorthand. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. Cf. chewstick.

    January 21, 2013

  • It's a tree.

    In railroad telegraphers' shorthand the word meant "Absorb lighterage charge(s)". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906. Compare chawstick.

    January 21, 2013

  • "What charge is made for this delivery?", in the abbreviated jargon of railroad telegraphy. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • One for the listers of weaponry and war-engines.

    January 21, 2013

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: "Are you certain?" in railroad telegraphers' shorthand.

    January 21, 2013

  • Akin to Bambicide. However, in the abbreviated jargon of railroad telegraphers, cervicide meant "Let cars go forward as consigned". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • "Forward _____ cars on Yardmaster's card waybill", in railroad telegraphers' shorthand. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: Railroad telegraphers' shorthand for "Cars cannot be supplied".

    January 21, 2013

  • "Unable to ship owing to scarcity of cars", in the shorthand notation of railroad telegraphers. --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • In the shorthand of railroad telegraphers carapato meant "Private baggage car(s) of the Theatrical Company ______". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    Otherwise, the term refers to a South American tick.

    January 21, 2013

  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand meaning "emigrant car(s)". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 21, 2013

  • A local representative of a cyclists' touring club. --from the definitions.

    January 21, 2013

  • lictor, a Roman fascist of sorts.
    consul

    January 21, 2013

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