Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A branched, decorative lighting fixture that holds a number of bulbs or candles and is suspended from a ceiling.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A branched, often ornate, lighting fixture suspended from the ceiling
  • n. A fictional bidder used to increase the price at an auction. Also called a wall.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A candlestick, lamp, stand, gas fixture, or the like, having several branches; esp., one hanging from the ceiling.
  • n. A movable parapet, serving to support fascines to cover pioneers.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A branched cluster of lights suspended from a ceiling by means of a tubular rod (as is usual when gas is used), or by a chain or other device.
  • n. In fortification, a movable parapet, serving to support fascines to cover pioneers.
  • n. A tallowchandler.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. branched lighting fixture; often ornate; hangs from the ceiling

Etymologies

Middle English chandeler, from Old French chandelier, from Vulgar Latin *candēlārium, alteration of Latin candēlābrum, candelabrum; see candelabrum.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French, from Latin candelabrum, from candela ("a candle"); see candle. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • Autumn hanging down all the trees are draped like chandeliers
    Now Sukie saw the beauty but she wasn’t wet behind the ears
    She had an A1 body and a face to match
    She didn’t have money, she didn’t have cash
    With the winter coming on, and the attic cold
    She had to press her nose on the refectory wall.


    (Sukie in the graveyard, by Belle and Sebastian)

    September 5, 2008