Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To put together into an orderly, functional, structured whole.
  • transitive v. To arrange in a coherent form; systematize: organized her thoughts before speaking.
  • transitive v. To arrange in a desired pattern or structure: "The painting is organized about a young reaper enjoying his noonday rest” ( William Carlos Williams).
  • transitive v. To arrange systematically for harmonious or united action: organize a strike. See Synonyms at arrange.
  • transitive v. To establish as an organization: organize a club. See Synonyms at found1.
  • transitive v. To induce (employees) to form or join a labor union.
  • transitive v. To induce the employees of (a business or an industry) to form or join a union: organize a factory.
  • intransitive v. To develop into or assume an organic structure.
  • intransitive v. To form or join an activist group, especially a labor union.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To arrange in working order.
  • v. To constitute in parts, each having a special function, act, office, or relation; to systematize.
  • v. To furnish with organs; to give an organic structure to; to endow with capacity for the functions of life; as, an organized being; organized matter; — in this sense used chiefly in the past participle.
  • v. To sing in parts.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To furnish with organs; to give an organic structure to; to endow with capacity for the functions of life; ; -- in this sense used chiefly in the past participle.
  • transitive v. To arrange or constitute in parts, each having a special function, act, office, or relation; to systematize; to get into working order; -- applied to products of the human intellect, or to human institutions and undertakings, as a science, a government, an army, a war, etc.
  • transitive v. To sing in parts.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To render organic; give an organic structure to; construct or modify so as to exhibit or subserve vital processes: commonly in the past participle.
  • In general, to form into a whole consisting of interdependent parts; coördinate the parts of; systematize; arrange according to a uniform plan or for a given purpose; provide with a definite structure or constitution; order.
  • In music, to sing or arrange in parts: as, to organize the halleluiah.
  • Synonyms To constitute, construct.
  • To assume an organic structure or a definite formation or constitution, as a number of individuals; become coördinated or systematically arranged or ordered.
  • Also spelled organise.
  • To arrange; plan; prepare.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. create (as an entity)
  • v. form or join a union
  • v. cause to be structured or ordered or operating according to some principle or idea
  • v. bring order and organization to
  • v. plan and direct (a complex undertaking)
  • v. arrange by systematic planning and united effort

Etymologies

Middle English organisen, from Old French organiser, from Medieval Latin organizāre, from Latin organum, tool, instrument; see organ.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From New Latin organizare ("to organize") (compare Medieval Latin organizare ("to play on the organ")), from Latin organum ("organ"); see organ. (Wiktionary)

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