Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To force, press, or squeeze into an insufficient space; stuff.
  • transitive v. To fill too tightly.
  • transitive v. To gorge with food.
  • transitive v. To eat quickly and greedily.
  • transitive v. Informal To prepare (students) hastily for an impending examination.
  • intransitive v. To gorge oneself with food.
  • intransitive v. Informal To study hastily for an impending examination: was up all night cramming for the history midterm.
  • n. A group that has been crammed together; a crush.
  • n. Informal Hasty study for an imminent examination.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of cramming.
  • n. Information hastily memorized; as, a cram from an examination.
  • n. A warp having more than two threads passing through each dent or split of the reed.
  • v. To press, force, or drive, particularly in filling, or in thrusting one thing into another; to stuff; to crowd; to fill to superfluity; as, to cram anything into a basket; to cram a room with people.
  • v. To fill with food to satiety; to stuff.
  • v. To put hastily through an extensive course of memorizing or study, as in preparation for an examination; as, a pupil is crammed by his tutor.
  • v. Study hard, swot.
  • v. To eat greedily, and to satiety; to stuff.
  • v. To make crude preparation for a special occasion, as an examination, by a hasty and extensive course of memorizing or study.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of cramming.
  • n. Information hastily memorized.
  • n. A warp having more than two threads passing through each dent or split of the reed.
  • intransitive v. To eat greedily, and to satiety; to stuff.
  • intransitive v. To make crude preparation for a special occasion, as an examination, by a hasty and extensive course of memorizing or study.
  • transitive v. To press, force, or drive, particularly in filling, or in thrusting one thing into another; to stuff; to crowd; to fill to superfluity.
  • transitive v. To fill with food to satiety; to stuff.
  • transitive v. To put hastily through an extensive course of memorizing or study, as in preparation for an examination.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To press or drive, particularly thrust (one thing), into another forcibly; stuff; crowd: as, to cram things into a basket or bag.
  • To fill with more than can be properly, conveniently, or comfortably contained; fill to repletion; overcrowd: as, to cram a room with people.
  • To fill with food beyond what is necessary, or to satiety; stuff.
  • To endeavor to qualify (a pupil or one's self) for an examination, or other special purpose, in a comparatively short time, by storing the memory with information, not so much with a view to real learning as to passing the examination; coach.
  • To tell lies to; fill up with false stories.
  • To eat greedily or to satiety; stuff one's self.
  • To store the memory hastily with facts, for the purpose of passing an examination or for some other immediate use; in general, to acquire knowledge hurriedly by a forced process, without assimilating it: as, to cram for a civil-service examination; to cram for a lecture.
  • n. In weaving, a warp having more than two threads in each dent or split of the reed.
  • n. The act or the result of cramming the memory; information acquired hurriedly and not assimilated.
  • n. A lie.
  • n. A densely packed gathering or crowd; a crush; a ‘jam.’

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. prepare (students) hastily for an impending exam
  • v. put something somewhere so that the space is completely filled
  • v. crowd or pack to capacity
  • v. study intensively, as before an exam

Etymologies

Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian; see ger- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "FIRST CITIZEN: Care for us! True, indeed! They ne'er cared for us yet. Suffer us to famish, and their storehouses crammed with grain; make edicts for usury, to support usurers; repeal daily any wholesome act established against the rich, and provide more piercing statutes daily to chain up and restrain the poor."
    - William Shakespeare, 'The Tragedy of Coriolanus'.

    August 28, 2009

  • Marc in reverse:
    1. The pulpy residue left after the juice has been pressed from grapes, apples, or other fruits.
    2. Brandy distilled from grape or apple residue.

    July 30, 2007