Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A shelter for a dog.
  • n. A pack of dogs, especially hounds. See Synonyms at flock1.
  • n. An establishment where dogs are bred, trained, or boarded.
  • n. The lair of a wild animal, such as a fox.
  • transitive v. To place or keep in or as if in a kennel.
  • intransitive v. To take cover or lie in or as if in a kennel.
  • n. A gutter along a street.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A house or shelter for a dog.
  • n. A facility at which dogs are reared or boarded.
  • n. The dogs kept at such a facility; a pack of hounds.
  • v. To house or board a dog (or less commonly another animal).
  • n. A gutter at the edge of a street.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The water course of a street; a little canal or channel; a gutter; also, a puddle.
  • n. A house for a dog or for dogs, or for a pack of hounds.
  • n. A pack of hounds, or a collection of dogs.
  • n. The hole of a fox or other beast; a haunt.
  • intransitive v. To lie or lodge; to dwell, as a dog or a fox.
  • transitive v. To put or keep in a kennel.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To lodge or dwell in a kennel, or in the manner of a dog or a fox.
  • To keep or confine in a kennel.
  • n. A house or cot for a dog, or for a pack of hounds.
  • n. A pack of hounds; a collection of dogs of any breed or of different breeds.
  • n. The hole of a fox or other beast; a haunt.
  • n. A little canal or channel; specifically, the drainage-channel of a street; a gutter.
  • n. A head-dress worn by women in the reign of Henry VIII.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. outbuilding that serves as a shelter for a dog
  • v. put up in a kennel

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English kenel, from Anglo-Norman *kenil, from Medieval Latin canīle, from Latin canis, dog; see kwon- in Indo-European roots.
Middle English cannel, from Old North French canel, channel, from Latin canālis; see canal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman, from a Old Northern French variant of Old French chenil (whence modern French chenil), from Vulgar Latin *canile, ultimately from Latin canis

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Examples

  • III. ii.89 (83,6) [Go -- to kennel, Pompey -- go] It should be remembered, that Pompey is the common name of a dog, to which allusion is made in the mention of a _kennel_.

    Notes to Shakespeare — Volume 01: Comedies

  • The word kennel developed so many negative associations and did not reflect the high-end services offered by boarding facilities that the American Boarding Kennel Association changed its name several years ago to the Pet Care Services Association, said Susan Briggs, a past president.

    Boston.com Top Stories

  • Some of the violations described in kennel inspection reports include:

    Wayne Pacelle: A Dozen More Reasons for Supporting Missouri's Prop B

  • I used to think that wasn't right but vets say a properly sized kennel is actually comforting to the dog.

    My Dog Ate the _________?

  • Her kennel is her spot though and I believe that she does truly feel comfortable there.

    My Dog Ate the _________?

  • I called the kennel to get the doggy hotel squared away; in haste I reserved their kennel stay for the day of the surgery and the day Mr. Sleyed needs to get back to work, totally forgetting that we are leaving early so I don't have to do the day-before-surgery prep in the car.

    More thoughts on ENDO

  • Again, totally guilt-free for me, anyhow, although my wife makes me call the kennel every day we're gone to make sure they're doing all right.

    The Speculist: Virtual Kids

  • I would have heard if there had been, for the stable door was open all the time and his kennel is right across from it! '

    Rilla of Ingleside

  • Their lives were like those of their class: incessant labor, sleeping in kennel-like rooms, eating rank pork and molasses, drinking — God and the distillers only know what; with an occasional night in jail, to atone for some drunken excess.

    Life in the Iron Mills

  • The man said he called the kennel to request copies of X-rays and veterinary records, but an employee refused and became defensive before hanging up on him.

    Record Article Feed

Comments

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  • a dog's place, a gutter or a headdress!

    February 8, 2013