Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A deciduous tree (Carya illinoinensis) of the central and southern United States, having deeply furrowed bark, pinnately compound leaves, and edible nuts.
  • n. The smooth, thin-shelled oval nut of this tree.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A deciduous tree Carya illinoinensis of the central and southern United States, having deeply furrowed bark, pinnately compound leaves, and edible nuts.
  • n. A smooth, thin-shelled, edible oval nut of this tree.
  • n. A half of the edible portion of the inside of this nut.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A species of hickory (Carya olivæformis), growing in North America, chiefly in the Mississippi valley and in Texas, where it is one of the largest of forest trees; also, its fruit, a smooth, oblong nut, an inch or an inch and a half long, with a thin shell and well-flavored meat.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A North American tree, Hicoria Pecan (Carya olivæ-formis).
  • n. The nut of the pecan-tree, which is olive-shaped, an inch long or over, smooth and thin-shelled, with a very sweet and oily meat. It is gathered in large quantities for the general market.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. wood of a pecan tree
  • n. tree of southern United States and Mexico cultivated for its nuts
  • n. smooth brown oval nut of south central United States

Etymologies

North American French pacane, from Illinois pakani.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Borrowed into English from the French word pacane and at first spelt paccan. The French word derives from an Algonquian word, perhaps Miami (Illinois) pakani. Compare Cree pakan ("hard nut"), Ojibwe bagaan, Abenaki pagann, bagôn, pagôn ("nut; walnut, hazelnut"). (Wiktionary)

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