Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Marked by or having a disposition to talk.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Tending to talk a lot.
  • adj. Speaking openly and honestly, neglecting privacy and consequences.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Given to much talking.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Inclined to talk or converse; ready or apt to engage in conversation; freely communicative; chatty.
  • Synonyms Talkative, Loquacious, Garrulous. Talkative is a mildly unfavorable word; the others are clearly unfavorable. Talkative is applied to a person who is in the habit of speaking frequently, whether much is said at one speaking or not: thus, a lively child may be talkative. A loquacious person is one who has this inclination with a greater flow of words, and perhaps a disposition to make many-words of a small matter. Garrulous is the word applied to mental decline, as in old age, and implies feeble, prosy, continuous talk, with needless repetitions and tiresome details. The subject of a garrulous person's talk is generally himself or his own affairs or observations.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. friendly and open and willing to talk
  • adj. full of trivial conversation
  • adj. unwisely talking too much

Etymologies

From Middle English talcatife, equivalent to talk +‎ -ative. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I could make no reply, indeed I hardly spoke another word the rest of the evening; so little talkative is the fulness of contentment.

    Evelina: or, The History of a Young Lady's Entrance Into the World

  • But in their preface to the poem they make the further point (borrowed, with due acknowledgment, from critic Christopher Ricks) that voluble in its modern sense -- "talkative" -- is what the serpent is about to become.

    Cosmic and Sublime

  • But in their preface to the poem they make the further point (borrowed, with due acknowledgment, from the critic Christopher Ricks) that voluble in its modern sense -- "talkative" -- is what the serpent is about to become.

    Cosmic and Sublime

  • By age three, kids who were talked to regularly by their parents (called the talkative group) had IQ scores 1.5 times higher than those kids whose parents talked to them the least (called the taciturn group).

    John Medina, Ph.D.: Can Speaking 'Parentese' To Your Baby Make Her Smarter? (VIDEO)

  • Dozier, who underwent a series of operations, is described as talkative and in good spirits, the only decent news to come out of this tragedy.

    CNN Transcript Jun 11, 2006

  • Basile shot the breeze with me for a time, but he isn't what you'd call talkative, you know.

    Fat Tuesday

  • I gather that I was not very talkative, which is rather understandable under the circumstances; that I very rarely cried; and that I smiled almost constantly, from which I deduce that my indigestion was usually bad enough to produce the kind of writhing grin which mothers confuse with contentment, but that it rarely became unbearable enough to reduce me to tears.

    An Autobiography

  • I should be called talkative indeed if I should attempt to develope the

    John Adams diary 6, 2 December 1760 - 3 March 1761

  • He could not be called a talkative personality; but with his detached calm manner he appeared as ready to keep the conversation going as to drop it at any moment.

    A Set of Six

  • Gnulemah could not be called talkative, yet in giving her thoughts expression she outdid vocabularies.

    Idolatry A Romance

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