Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A flat, usually rectangular piece of stiff paper, cardboard, or plastic, especially:
  • n. One of a set or pack bearing significant numbers, symbols, or figures, used in games and in divination.
  • n. A greeting card.
  • n. A post card.
  • n. One bearing a person's name and other information, used for purposes of identification or classification.
  • n. One bearing the image and often the statistics of a sports figure.
  • n. A business card.
  • n. A credit card.
  • n. A magnetic card.
  • n. One used for recording information in a file: an index card; a recipe card.
  • n. Games A game played with cards.
  • n. Games The playing of games with cards.
  • n. A program, especially for a sports event.
  • n. A menu, as in a restaurant.
  • n. A wine list.
  • n. Computer Science A circuit board, especially for use in a computer.
  • n. Computer Science A punch card.
  • n. A compass card.
  • n. Informal An eccentrically amusing person.
  • n. Something, such as an advantageous circumstance or tactical maneuver, that can be used to help gain an objective. Often used with play: "[He believed that] Soviet Russia ... had far more Iranian cards to play than the United States” ( Theodore Draper).
  • n. An appeal to a specified issue or argument, usually one involving strong emotions. Often used with play: "His exposure as a racist ... allowed the defense to play the race card” ( New York Times).
  • transitive v. To furnish with or attach to a card.
  • transitive v. To list (something) on a card; catalog.
  • transitive v. To check the identification of, especially in order to verify legal age.
  • transitive v. Sports To warn or eject (a soccer player who has committed a flagrant foul) by showing a yellow card or a red card.
  • card in To sign in, as at a place of business, by use of a magnetic card.
  • card out To sign out, as from a place of business, by use of a magnetic card.
  • idiom card up (one's) sleeve A secret resource or plan held in reserve: a tough negotiator who had a number of cards up his sleeve.
  • idiom in the cards Likely or certain to happen: My promotion to a higher position just isn't in the cards.
  • idiom put To make frank and clear revelation, as of one's motives or intentions.
  • n. A wire-toothed brush or a machine fitted with rows of wire teeth, used to disentangle fibers, as of wool, prior to spinning.
  • n. A device used to raise the nap on a fabric.
  • transitive v. To comb out or brush with a card.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A playing card.
  • n. Any game using playing cards; a card game.
  • n. A resource or an argument, used to achieve a purpose.
  • n. Any flat, normally rectangular piece of stiff paper, plastic etc.
  • n. A map or chart.
  • n. An amusing but slightly foolish person.
  • n. A list of scheduled events or of performers or contestants.
  • n. A tabular presentation of the key statistics of an innings or match: batsmen’s scores and how they were dismissed, extras, total score and bowling figures.
  • n. A removable electronic device that may be inserted into a powered electronic device to provide additional capability.
  • n. A greeting card.
  • n. A business card.
  • v. To check IDs at a venue with a minimum age requirement.
  • n. Material with embedded short wire bristles.
  • n. A comb- or brush-like device or tool to raise the nap on a fabric.
  • n. A hand-held tool formed similarly to a hairbrush but with bristles of wire or other rigid material. It is used principally with raw cotton, wool, hair, or other natural fibers to prepare these materials for spinning into yarn or thread on a spinning wheel, with a whorl or other hand-held spindle. The card serves to untangle, clean, remove debris from, and lay the fibers straight.
  • n. A machine for disentangling the fibres of wool prior to spinning.
  • v. To use a carding device to disentangle the fibres of wool prior to spinning.
  • v. To scrape or tear someone’s flesh using a metal comb, as a form of torture.
  • v. To comb with a card; to cleanse or disentangle by carding.
  • v. To clean or clear, as if by using a card.
  • v. To mix or mingle, as with an inferior or weaker article.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A piece of pasteboard, or thick paper, blank or prepared for various uses; ; pl. a game played with cards.
  • n. A published note, containing a brief statement, explanation, request, expression of thanks, or the like. Also, a printed programme, and (fig.), an attraction or inducement.
  • n. A paper on which the points of the compass are marked; the dial or face of the mariner's compass.
  • n. A perforated pasteboard or sheet-metal plate for warp threads, making part of the Jacquard apparatus of a loom. See Jacquard.
  • n. An indicator card. See under Indicator.
  • n. An instrument for disentangling and arranging the fibers of cotton, wool, flax, etc.; or for cleaning and smoothing the hair of animals; -- usually consisting of bent wire teeth set closely in rows in a thick piece of leather fastened to a back.
  • n. A roll or sliver of fiber (as of wool) delivered from a carding machine.
  • intransitive v. To play at cards; to game.
  • transitive v. To comb with a card; to cleanse or disentangle by carding.
  • transitive v. To clean or clear, as if by using a card.
  • transitive v. To mix or mingle, as with an inferior or weaker article.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To play at cards.
  • To comb or open, as wool, flax, hemp, etc., with a card, for the purpose of disentangling the fibers, cleansing from extraneous matter, separating the coarser parts, and making fine and soft for spinning.
  • To mingle; mix; weaken or debase by mixing.
  • n. A paper; a writing; a chart; a map.
  • n. A piece of thick paper or pasteboard prepared for various purposes.
  • n. A piece of cardboard on which is written or printed the name, or the name, address, etc., of the person presenting it, as in making a social visit, announcing the nature and place of one's business, etc. Cards intended for the former use are called visiting-cards. and for the latter business cards.
  • n. A paper on which the points of the compass are marked: used with a movable magnetic needle to form a compass. See compass and compass-card.
  • n. A piece of pasteboard or heavy note-paper on which is written or printed an invitation to a public or private entertainment, especially an invitation to or announcement of a wedding.
  • n. A short advertisement of one's business, or a personal statement of any kind, in a newspaper or other periodical.
  • n. Anything resembling a card in shape or use: as, a card of matches; “cards of yellow gingerbread,”
  • n. A frame filled with honeycomb; a sheet of honeycomb.
  • n. A perforated sheet of cardboard or metal, used in a Jacquard loom as a guide for the threads in weaving a pattern.
  • n. An eccentric person, or any one who has some notable peculiarity; a character.
  • n. A brush with wire teeth, used in disentangling fibers of wool, flax, or cotton, and laying them parallel to one another preparatory to spinning.
  • n. A carding-machine.
  • n. A currycomb made from a piece of card-clothing.
  • n. An abbreviation of cardinal.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a printed or written greeting that is left to indicate that you have visited
  • v. separate the fibers of
  • n. (baseball) a list of batters in the order in which they will bat
  • n. a rectangular piece of stiff paper used to send messages (may have printed greetings or pictures)
  • n. a printed circuit that can be inserted into expansion slots in a computer to increase the computer's capabilities
  • n. (golf) a record of scores (as in golf)
  • n. a witty amusing person who makes jokes
  • n. thin cardboard, usually rectangular
  • n. one of a set of small pieces of stiff paper marked in various ways and used for playing games or for telling fortunes
  • n. a list of dishes available at a restaurant
  • n. a sign posted in a public place as an advertisement
  • n. a card certifying the identity of the bearer
  • v. ask someone for identification to determine whether he or she is old enough to consume liquor

Etymologies

Middle English carde, from Old French carte, from Latin charta, paper made from papyrus, from Greek khartēs.
Middle English carde, from Medieval Latin cardus, from Latin carduus, thistle.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English carde ("playing card"), from Old French carte, from Latin charta, from Ancient Greek χάρτης (chartēs, "paper, papyrus"). (Wiktionary)
From Old French carde, from Old Provençal carda, deverbal from cardar, from Late Latin *carito, from Latin carrere ("to comb with a card"), from Proto-Indo-European *ker, *sker (“to cut”). (Wiktionary)

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  • Yes, its true

    June 3, 2012

  • "12. A brush with wire teeth, used in disentangling fibers of wool, flax, or cotton, and laying them parallel to one another preparatory to spinning. In hand-cards the wires are short and are passed slantingly through leather, which is then nailed upon a board. Two of these brushes are used, one in each hand, and in use are drawn past each other, the fibers being between them. In the carding-machine, which has superseded hand-carding, the cards are formed by hard-drawn wire staples, each furnishing two teeth, drawn through leather and bent at a certain angle. The material thus prepared is called card-clothing. See carding-machine."

    --Century Dictionary

    January 19, 2011

  • CArD

    May 10, 2008

  • as a witty amusing person who makes jokes

    February 24, 2008