Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The part of the body between the neck and the abdomen, enclosed by the ribs and the breastbone; the thorax.
  • n. A sturdy box with a lid and often a lock, used especially for storage.
  • n. A small closet or cabinet with shelves for storing supplies: a medicine chest above the bathroom sink.
  • n. The treasury of a public institution.
  • n. The funds kept there.
  • n. A box for the shipping of certain goods, such as tea.
  • n. The quantity packed in such a box.
  • n. A sealed receptacle for liquid, gas, or steam.
  • n. A bureau; a dresser.
  • idiom get (something) off (one's) chest To vent one's pent-up feelings.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A box, now usually a large strong box with a secure convex lid.
  • n. A coffin.
  • n. The place in which public money is kept; a treasury.
  • n. A chest of drawers.
  • n. The portion of the human body from the base of the neck to the top of the abdomen; the thorax. Also the analogous area in other animals.
  • n. A hit or blow made with one's chest (the front of one's body).
  • v. To hit with one's chest (front of one's body)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A large box of wood, or other material, having, like a trunk, a lid, but no covering of skin, leather, or cloth.
  • n. A coffin.
  • n. The part of the body inclosed by the ribs and breastbone; the thorax.
  • n. A case in which certain goods, as tea, opium, etc., are transported; hence, the quantity which such a case contains.
  • n. A tight receptacle or box, usually for holding gas, steam, liquids, etc..
  • n. Strife; contention; controversy.
  • intransitive v. To deposit in a chest; to hoard.
  • intransitive v. To place in a coffin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To deposit in a chest; hoard.
  • To place in a coffin.
  • n. A box, properly one of considerable size, made of wood, iron, or other material, with a hinged lid, used as a depository for treasure, papers of record, clothing, or other articles.
  • n. Specifically In com., a box-shaped case in which certain kinds of goods, as tea, indigo, opium, etc., are packed for transit.
  • n. The quantity such a case contains; a customary but uncertain measure of capacity for a few commodities: as, a chest of isinglass is 3½ hundredweight; a chest of cochineal is 1½ hundredweight.
  • n. A coffin.
  • n. The trunk of the body from the neck to the belly; the thorax (which see).
  • n. Debate; quarrel; strife; enmity.
  • n. The funds of a public institution, or the strong box, coffer, or place where such funds are, or are supposed to be, kept; the treasury: as, a military chest; the university chest; the chest for the relief of maimed manners; etc.
  • n. In organ-building, see wind-chest.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. box with a lid; used for storage; usually large and sturdy
  • n. furniture with drawers for keeping clothes
  • n. the front of the trunk from the neck to the abdomen
  • n. the part of the human torso between the neck and the diaphragm or the corresponding part in other vertebrates

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English cest, box, from West Germanic *kista, from Latin cista, from Greek kistē.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English ċest ("box"), from Proto-Germanic *kistō, from Latin cista, from Ancient Greek κίστη (kistē, "chest, box, basket, hamper"), from Proto-Indo-European *kisteh₂ (“woven container”). Cognates from Germanic include Dutch kist, German Kiste. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Failing, however, on examination of the man's chest, to find any sign of counter-irritation of the skin, he was somewhat puzzled; but he soon learned from the mistress of the house, that having no _chest_ at hand, she had clapped the plaster on a large box in the corner of the sick-chamber.

    Primitive Psycho-Therapy and Quackery

  • [_By placing the patient on the chest the weight of the body forces the air out; when turned on the side this pressure is removed, and air enters the chest_.]

    The Lifeboat

  • It is a matter of common experience, however, that in the utterance of tones of low pitch, whether speech tones or musical, the voice seems to come from the chest rather than from the head; and, in the utterance of tones of high pitch, on the other hand, it seems to come from the head rather than from the chest; so that all tones are said to belong either to the _lower_ or _chest register_, or to the

    The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886

  • I've tried several different bags and vests and I have found that having the calls right in the center of your chest is the best spot for them for easy access and mobility.

    Your favorite turkey vest, Also any turkey hunting tips?

  • Inspired by vintage printing blocks, this chest is a throwback to a bygone era, but it fits perfectly into our modern day desires for beautiful, eco-friendly design.

    2009 June | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World

  • The one on the left side of the chest is a big cat -- puma/panther/cougar type-thing -- again in black outline.

    Email Sorted

  • Under the chest is the chambarete de mano (fore shank).

    Choice Cut Or Mystery Meat? A Guide To Mexican Butcher Shops: Part I - Beef

  • The back part of the chest is the flat cut Americans generally think of as brisket.

    Choice Cut Or Mystery Meat? A Guide To Mexican Butcher Shops: Part I - Beef

  • They're the lean whip of a guy who had the fast metabolism seemingly forever, snarfing down burgers by the bagful -- shakes by the gallon, and now thirty-plus years old, BOOM!, the jello-shaking gut appears, he can't get up the steps anymore, and his chest is always hurting him now.

    The Fall Of The House Of Bush

  • Not as bad as a steering wheel in the face I'm sure, but a feeling something like a sledgehammer in the chest is a nice consolation prize.

    Sound Politics: Thanks

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