Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A narrow gorge, usually with a stream flowing through it.
  • n. An open artificial channel or chute carrying a stream of water, as for furnishing power or conveying logs.
  • n. A very small swimming pool designed with a propeller or pump to generate a current, allowing a swimmer to swim in place.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A ravine or gorge, usually one with water running through.
  • n. An open channel or trough used to direct or divert liquids.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A stream; especially, a passage channel, or conduit for the water that drives a mill wheel; or an artifical channel of water for hydraulic or placer mining; also, a chute for conveying logs or lumber down a declivity.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In gold-mining, to carry off in a flume, as the water of a stream, in order to lay bare the auriferous sand and gravel forming the bed.
  • In lumbering, to transport, as logs or timbers, by a flume.
  • To conduct a channel or canal, by a flume, along an artificial temporary construction in situations where an earth or masonry channel cannot readily be secured by excavation and embankment.
  • To build a flume or artificial channel and its supporting construction.
  • n. A stream; a river.
  • n. In physical geography, in the United States, especially in New England, a narrow defile with nearly vertical walls, the bottom of which is usually occupied by a mountain torrent.
  • n. An artificial channel for a stream of water to be applied to some industrial use.
  • n. An inclined trough in which water runs, used in transporting logs or timbers.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a narrow gorge with a stream running through it
  • n. watercourse that consists of an open artificial chute filled with water for power or for carrying logs

Etymologies

Middle English flum, river, from Old French, from Latin flūmen, from fluere, to flow; see bhleu- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English flum, from Old French flum, flun, from Latin flumen, from fluere ("to flow"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And that a flume is an open artificial water channel, that leads water from a diversion dam or weir completely aside a natural flow, often an elevated box structure (typically wood) that follows the natural contours of the land?

    Chess on a Rollercoaster : #comments

  • He came to watch us train in what we call the flume but didn't get too involved, he just stood there taking it all in.

    Evening Standard - Home

  • In this snow many of the shanties of the abandoned mining camp were obliterated (a sailor might have said they had gone down), and at irregular intervals it had overtopped the tall trestles which had once supported a river called a flume; for, of course, 'flume' is flumen.

    Can Such Things Be

  • In this snow many of the shanties of the abandoned mining camp were obliterated, (a sailor might have said they had gone down) and at irregular intervals it had overtopped the tall trestles which had once supported a river called a flume; for, of course, "flume" is flumen.

    Can Such Things Be?

  • Oh and the mom in the back having way more fun than her two kids. (btw, did you know that a log flume is a flume specifically constructed to transport lumber and logs down mountainous terrain to a sawmill by using flowing water?

    Chess on a Rollercoaster : #comments

  • Somewhere between the Lifelight pyramid and the flume was a red arch.

    Raven Rise

  • In this snow many of the shanties of the aban - doned mining camp were obliterated (a sailor might have said they had gone down), and at irregular in - tervals it had overtopped the tall trestles which had once supported a river called a flume; for, of course,

    Can Such Things Be

  • The flume was a square trough, open at the top and several miles in length.

    In the Footprints of the Padres

  • Mayor Wallace Cartwright sent the letter to Shelbyville Power, Water and Sewer manager David Crowell on March 31, which requested that it was the city's belief that sharing the repair costs for the flume should be the responsibility of the utility "or its agents and contractors."

    Shelbyville Times-Gazette Headlines

  • City officials plan this summer to replace a concrete stormwater drainage system, known as a flume, with what they believe to be a more environmentally friendly alternative, the natural grasses and plants that will collect rainwater and lessen runoff.

    Photos - DesMoinesRegister.com

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