Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act or process of excavating.
  • n. A hole formed by excavating.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of excavating, or of making hollow, by cutting, scooping, or digging out a part of a solid mass.
  • n. A cavity formed by cutting, digging, or scooping.
  • n. An uncovered cutting in the earth, in distinction from a covered cutting or tunnel.
  • n. The material dug out in making a channel or cavity.
  • n. Archaeological research that unearths buildings, tombs and objects of historical value.
  • n. A site where an archaeological exploration is being carried out.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of excavating, or of making hollow, by cutting, scooping, or digging out a part of a solid mass.
  • n. A cavity formed by cutting, digging, or scooping.
  • n.
  • n. An uncovered cutting in the earth, in distinction from a covered cutting or tunnel.
  • n. The material dug out in making a channel or cavity.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of making a thing hollow by removing the interior substance or part; the digging out of material, or its removal by any means, so as to form a cavity or hollow: as, the excavation of land by flowing water.
  • n. A hollow or cavity formed by removing the interior substance: as, many animals burrow in excavations of their own forming.
  • n. In engineering, an open cutting, as in a railway, in distinction from a tunnel.
  • n. In zoology, a deep and somewhat irregular hollow with well-defined edges, as if a piece had been taken out of the surface.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of digging
  • n. the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earth
  • n. the site of an archeological exploration
  • n. a hole in the ground made by excavating

Etymologies

From Latin excavatio ("a hollowing out"), from excavare ("to hollow out"), from ex- (out) + cavare (to hollow)< cavus (hollow)< Proto-Indo-European *keu- (“vault, hole”) (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • It also means that no excavation is required when installing the Levytator.

    Levytator VIDEO: Watch The World's First Freeform, Curving Escalator In Action

  • When a witness to this excavation is killed by the military, his Smilla-esque sister Kristin – single, self-sufficient, ballsy – sets out to discover why.

    Thrillers – review

  • Nevertheless, from reading it myself, I venture to predict that if an excavation is made in the main basement, somewhere in the vicinity of the foundation of the great chimney, a collection of bones will be found which should very closely resemble those which James

    THE ETERNITY OF FORMS

  • The excavation is finally there; the place where it all began, and where the whole thing will come to an end.

    weekly

  • Nutter Const was last week awarded a contract to begin excavation for a new 50 M gallon storage facility on Powell Butte.

    In with the water bill (Jack Bog's Blog)

  • Justin and Annie wonder if they will ever see their child again, the reader becomes aware that a third delicate excavation is taking place within these pages.

    Ursula, Under by Ingrid Hill: Questions

  • He added that such an addition should only be made "with the understanding that it not remove any other excavation from the schedule."

    Holm, Arnold E. Jr.

  • "As more and more excavation is done, one would expect to see more evidence for dense populations than has thus far emerged."

    1491

  • "The excavation is either in the middle of water - filled rice paddies or hanging off the side of a cliff."

    Martin, Douglas K.

  • The site remains open, but continued excavation is needed.

    Wann, Donald L.

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