Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. All of the offspring that are at the same stage of descent from a common ancestor: Mother and daughters represent two generations.
  • n. Biology A form or stage in the life cycle of an organism: asexual generation of a fern.
  • n. The average interval of time between the birth of parents and the birth of their offspring.
  • n. A group of individuals born and living about the same time.
  • n. A group of generally contemporaneous individuals regarded as having common cultural or social characteristics and attitudes: "They're the television generation” ( Roger Enrico).
  • n. A stage or period of sequential technological development and innovation.
  • n. A class of objects derived from a preceding class: a new generation of computers.
  • n. The formation of a line or geometric figure by the movement of a point or line.
  • n. The act or process of generating; origination, production, or procreation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of generating or begetting; procreation, as of animals.
  • n. Origination by some process, mathematical, chemical, or vital; production; formation; as, the generation of sounds, of gases, of curves, etc
  • n. That which is generated or brought forth; progeny; offspring.
  • n. A period of around thirty years, the average amount of time before a child takes the place of its parents.
  • n. A single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or remove in genealogy, or collectively the body of people who are of the same genealogical rank or remove from an ancestor; the mass of beings living at one time.
  • n. Race; kind; family; breed; stock.
  • n. The formation or production of any geometrical magnitude, as a line, a surface, a solid, by the motion, in accordance with a mathematical law, of a point or a magnitude; as, the generation of a line or curve by the motion of a point, of a surface by a line, a sphere by a semicircle, etc.
  • n. The aggregate of the functions and phenomena which attend reproduction.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of generating or begetting; procreation, as of animals.
  • n. Origination by some process, mathematical, chemical, or vital; production; formation
  • n. That which is generated or brought forth; progeny; offspiring.
  • n. A single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or remove in genealogy. Hence: The body of those who are of the same genealogical rank or remove from an ancestor; the mass of beings living at one period; also, the average lifetime of man, or the ordinary period of time at which one rank follows another, or father is succeeded by child, usually assumed to be one third of a century; an age.
  • n. Race; kind; family; breed; stock.
  • n. The formation or production of any geometrical magnitude, as a line, a surface, a solid, by the motion, in accordance with a mathematical law, of a point or a magnitude
  • n. The aggregate of the functions and phenomene which attend reproduction.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act, process, or function of generating or begetting; procreation; propagation; reproduction; multiplication of kind.
  • n. In theology, the communication of the Divine Essence from God the Father to God the Son.
  • n. A bringing out or forth; evolution, as from a source or cause; production, especially by some natural process or causation: as, the generation of sounds.
  • n. In mathematics, the description of a geometrical figure by the motion of a point, line, plane, or figure, in accordance with a mathematical law. Also genesis.
  • n. That which is generated; progeny; offspring.
  • n. A single succession of living beings in natural descent, as the offspring or descendants in the same degree of the same parents.
  • n. The whole body of persons of the same period or living at the same time: as, the present generation.
  • n. Family; race; kind; by extension, any allied or associated group of persons; a class.
  • n. The age or period of a generation; hence, the average lifetime of all persons of synchronous age.
  • n. Same as spontaneous generation
  • n. The individuals of a given mineral species which have been formed at the same time and under similar conditions, as in the solidification of an igneous rock, or the deposits in a mineral vein.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. all the people living at the same time or of approximately the same age
  • n. the production of heat or electricity
  • n. the act of producing offspring or multiplying by such production
  • n. the normal time between successive generations
  • n. group of genetically related organisms constituting a single step in the line of descent
  • n. a coming into being
  • n. a stage of technological development or innovation

Etymologies

From Middle English generacioun, from Old French generacion, from Latin generātiō, from generāre, present active infinitive of generō ("to beget, generate"); see generate. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • But where, as in the present section, we treat the descent theory apart from the evolution theory, we have also to think of the possibility that the species or groups of species are not originated through gradual development, but nevertheless do originate through descent -- namely, in leaps through metamorphosis of germs or a heterogenetic generation; and for such an idea we find confirmation in the {74} observation of the history of development of animals, which we call _change of generation_ or

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • It might be safe and legitimate enough, when we find a fossil organism imbedded in the earth, to ascribe its production to the ordinary law of generation, even although we had not witnessed the fact of its birth, provided the same species is known to have existed previously; but when we find _new races_ coming into being, for which the ordinary law of derivation cannot account, we are not at liberty to apply the same rule to a case so essentially different, and still less to postulate _a spontaneous generation_, or a _transmutation of species_, for which we have no experience at all.

    Modern Atheism under its forms of Pantheism, Materialism, Secularism, Development, and Natural Laws

  • $self = ~ s / my \$generation = (\d+); / 'my $generation ='.

    Refinance 2nd Mortgage

  • I prefer to reflect on the cops at their listening post (in the bread van?) hearing the ancient prayers: "Not in one generation alone have they risen against us, but in every generation….

    On Being Busted at Fifty

  • Individual traits are not transmitted from the hen to the egg, but they develop out of germinal factors which are carried along from _cell to cell, and from generation to generation_ ....”

    Manhood of Humanity.

  • The term generation is used in reference to birth cohorts, a group of individuals born at the same general period of time.

    The Population of the United States

  • Years before the term "generation gap" was coined, "Hound Dog" drew the line between the new and the old.

    NYT > Home Page

  • In this column I will use the term generation 2 garbage collection instead of full garbage collection, but they are interchangeable.

    MSDN Magazine: RSS Feed

  • This generation is my mother's generation, one that, I believe, is unlike any other in what was asked of them.

    An Interview with Kate Walberg

  • Oil, housing and health, this reeks of business as usual, and another generation is again held financial hostage.

    Emanuel faces liberal pressure over 'trigger' comments

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Comments

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  • I think it's usually considered roughly 20-25 years. But not in terms of identity--that's what the op-ed wars are about--and more in terms of ... I don't know ... genealogy.

    April 27, 2008

  • I don't think you can, which is why we have those interminable op-ed wars.

    April 26, 2008

  • Serious question: How do you measure a "generation"?

    April 26, 2008

  • I can read this word without thinking about The Who song.

    October 14, 2007