Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act or process of dislocating or the state of having been dislocated: "the severe emotional dislocation experienced by millions of immigrants . . . who were forced to separate themselves forever from the . . . circle of people and places on which they had depended” ( Doris Kearns Goodwin).
  • n. Displacement of a body part, especially the temporary displacement of a bone from its normal position.
  • n. Chemistry An imperfection in the crystal structure of a metal or other solid resulting from an absence of an atom or atoms in one or more layers of a crystal.
  • n. Geology See displacement.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of displacing, or the state of being displaced.
  • n. The displacement of parts of rocks or portions of strata from the situation which they originally occupied. Slips, faults, and the like, are dislocations.
  • n. The act of dislocating, or putting out of joint; also, the condition of being thus displaced.
  • n. A linear defect in a crystal lattice. Because dislocations can shift within the crystal lattice, they tend to weaken the material, compared to a perfect crystal.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of displacing, or the state of being displaced.
  • n. The displacement of parts of rocks or portions of strata from the situation which they originally occupied. Slips, faults, and the like, are dislocations.
  • n. The act of dislocating, or putting out of joint; also, the condition of being thus displaced.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Displacement; derangement or disorder of parts.
  • n. Specifically
  • n. In surgery: The displacement or separation of the parts of a joint; the unjointing of a limb; luxation.
  • n. Anatomical displacement, as of an organ through disease or violence; malposition.
  • n. In geology, a break in the continuity of strata, usually attended with more or less movement of the rocks on one side or the other, so that, in following any one stratum, it will be found to be above or below the place which it would have occupied had no break or dislocation occurred. See fault.
  • n. The territorial distribution of an army.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of disrupting an established order so it fails to continue
  • n. an event that results in a displacement or discontinuity
  • n. a displacement of a part (especially a bone) from its normal position (as in the shoulder or the vertebral column)

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from stem of Medieval Latin dislocatio, delocatio (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In some persons the ligaments of the joint are unnaturally lax, and dislocation is liable to occur repeatedly from comparatively slight causes -- _recurrent dislocation_.

    Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities—Head—Neck. Sixth Edition.

  • _Fractures of metatarsal bones_; _Fractures of phalanges_ -- DISLOCATIONS: _Of ankle joint_; _Of inferior tibio-fibular joint_; _Complete dislocation of talus_; _Sub-taloid dislocation_; _Medio-tarsal dislocation_; _Tarso-metatarsal dislocation_; _Dislocations of toes_.

    Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities—Head—Neck. Sixth Edition.

  • The temporal dislocation is performative, a matter of backdrops and props, idioms of rewritten dialogue.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • Stories of death and dislocation from the superpower invasion of 1979, and now from the American occupation, entering its tenth year.

    Kathy Kelly: Planting the Seeds

  • After stories of death and dislocation from the Soviet invasion of 1979, and now from the American occupation, Nur Akbari imagines communities learning to provide for themselves.

    Kathy Kelly: Planting the Seeds

  • Worse than that, a gradual dislocation is occuring where the rest of us are pushing for more energy efficient devices and vehicles, alternate energy sources and a generally less energy intensive economy.

    Think Progress » The Reviews Are In: John Bolton Is Failing At the United Nations

  • It's a little too early to tell exactly the types of things that are driving that and if it's just short-term sticker shock, if it's short-term dislocation because of those price gaps that I talked about, long term, when you look at pairs purchased per year in a lot of our basic categories, those numbers have been extremely stable over the last decade or more.

  • "Many, many, many - maybe 80 percent - of the numbers you are seeing in the report would turn into long-term dislocation," Elnashai said.

    KansasCity.com: Front Page

  • They'll be aware that there might be a bit of short-term dislocation as a number of high income earners up-and-off with their businesses, but there's no way a bunch of socialists are going to go soft on confiscatory taxation just for the sake of looking after the health of a capitalist economy.

    The Coffee House | Politics and News Discussion Forum

  • Thompson's dislocation from the English game can be traced to the moment in January 2008

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

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