Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of encrusting.
  • n. The state of being encrusted.
  • n. A crust or coating: an incrustation of salt on the window.
  • n. A decorative technique in which a contrasting material is applied to a surface as an inlay or overlay.
  • n. A material so applied.
  • n. Biology A coating of hardened exudate or other material on a body or body part; a scale or scab.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of incrusting, or the state of being incrusted.
  • n. A crust or hard coating of anything upon or within a body, as a deposit of lime, sediment, etc., from water on the inner surface of a steam boiler.
  • n. A covering or inlaying of marble, mosaic, etc., attached to the masonry by cramp irons or cement.
  • n. Anything inlaid or imbedded.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of incrusting, or the state of being incrusted.
  • n. A crust or hard coating of anything upon or within a body, as a deposit of lime, sediment, etc., from water on the inner surface of a steam boiler.
  • n. A covering or inlaying of marble, mosaic, etc., attached to the masonry by cramp irons or cement.
  • n. Anything inlaid or imbedded.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of incrusting; the act of covering or lining with any foreign substance; the state of being incrusted.
  • n. A crust or coat of anything on the surface of a body; a covering, coating, or scale, as of mineral substances deposited by a spring or stream, or by the water in a steam-boiler; an efflorescence, as of salt or soda on the surface of the ground.
  • n. An inlaying of anything, as a plaque, tile, lacquer, veneer, mosaic, or the like, into or upon the surface, as of a cabinet, mantelpiece, etc.
  • n. An incrusted or inlaid object or substance.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the formation of a crust
  • n. a hard outer layer that covers something
  • n. a decorative coating of contrasting material that is applied to a surface as an inlay or overlay

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Cadmium salts can be recognized by the brown incrustation which is formed when they are heated on charcoal in the oxidizing flame of the blowpipe; and also by the yellow precipitate formed when sulphuretted hydrogen is passed though their acidified solutions.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 "Bulgaria" to "Calgary"

  • It will be thus seen that there are no changes of any essential kind in the chemical composition of the bast fibre throughout the life-history of the plant, confirming the conclusion that the 'incrustation' view of lignification is consistent only with the structural features of the changes, and so far as it has assumed the gradual overlaying of a cellulose fibre with the lignone substance it is not in accordance with the facts.

    Researches on Cellulose 1895-1900

  • The sweet principle of honey and molasses, and the incrustation which is so frequently seen on figs and raisins, are also essentially the same substance.

    Religion and Chemistry

  • a piece of moral turpitude -- or at best a sign of lassitude, stupidity, and Toryism; because it means that one's mind is made up and that one has some dull theory which life and the thoughts of others may confirm if they will, but must not modify: from which deadly kind of incrustation may common-sense and human interest deliver us.

    The Silent Isle

  • It is used to treat infections caused alongside fungus on the incrustation and in the body.

    Burning the Fat: Fueled by Fatuousness

  • The uncovered part had the appearance of a huge cylinder, caked over and its outline softened by a thick scaly dun-coloured incrustation.

    The War of The Worlds

  • Then suddenly he noticed with a start that some of the grey clinker, the ashy incrustation that covered the meteorite, was falling off the circular edge of the end.

    The War of The Worlds

  • All are lighter than recent bones, with the exception of those which have a calcareous incrustation, and the cavities of which are filled with such matter.

    Essays

  • This pathway ran up hill, across another open space covered with white incrustation, and plunged into a canebrake again.

    The Island of Doctor Moreau

  • Presently we came to trees, all charred and brown, and so to a bare place covered with a yellow-white incrustation, across which a drifting smoke, pungent in whiffs to nose and eyes, went drifting.

    The Island of Doctor Moreau

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  • "...a huge, humped old bull, which by his comparatively slow progress, as well as by the unusual yellowish incrustations overgrowing him, seemed afflicted with the jaundice, or some other infirmity."
    Moby-Dick, ch. 81

    June 15, 2009