Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A lack of order or regular arrangement; confusion.
  • n. A breach of civic order or peace; a public disturbance.
  • n. An ailment that affects the function of mind or body: eating disorders and substance abuse.
  • transitive v. To throw into confusion or disarray.
  • transitive v. To disturb the normal physical or mental health of; derange.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Absence of order; state of not being arranged in an orderly manner.
  • n. A disturbance of civic peace or of public order.
  • n. A physical or psychical malfunction.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Want of order or regular disposition; lack of arrangement; confusion; disarray
  • n. Neglect of order or system; irregularity.
  • n. Breach of public order; disturbance of the peace of society; tumult.
  • n. Disturbance of the functions of the animal economy or of the soul; sickness; derangement.
  • transitive v. To disturb the order of; to derange or disarrange; to throw into confusion; to confuse.
  • transitive v. To disturb or interrupt the regular and natural functions of (either body or mind); to produce sickness or indisposition in; to discompose; to derange.
  • transitive v. To depose from holy orders.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To destroy or derange the order of; derange; disturb the regular disposition or arrangement of; throw into confusion; disarrange; confuse.
  • To derange the physical or mental health of; bring into a morbid condition of body or mind; indispose.
  • To produce mental disturbance in; unsettle the mind of; perturb; agitate.
  • To derange the natural or regular functions of; throw out of order or balance; unsettle the normal condition of: as, to disorder one's liver; his mind is disordered.
  • To depose from holy orders.
  • n. Lack of order or regular arrangement; irregularity; indiscriminate distribution; confusion: as, the troops were thrown into disorder; the papers are in disorder.
  • n. Tumult; disturbance of the peace of society; breach of public order or law.
  • n. Neglect of rule; disregard of conventionality.
  • n. Morbid irregularity, disturbance, or interruption of the functions of the animal economy or of the mind; physical or mental derangement; properly, a diseased state of either mind or body that does not wholly disable the faculties; but it is often applied more comprehensively.
  • n. A specific or particular case of disorder; a disease; a derangement, mental or physical: as, gout is a painful disorder.
  • n. Mental perturbation; temporary excitement or discomposure; agitation.
  • n. Synonyms Disarrangement, disorganization, disarray, jumble.
  • n. Commotion, turbulence, riotousness.
  • n. 4 and Illness, ailment, complaint, malady.
  • n. In logic, disagreement with every conceivable general rule whatever.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. bring disorder to
  • n. a condition in which things are not in their expected places
  • n. a physical condition in which there is a disturbance of normal functioning
  • n. a disturbance of the peace or of public order
  • v. disturb in mind or make uneasy or cause to be worried or alarmed

Etymologies

dis- +‎ order (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • If order is the rule in the universe, and what we term disorder is a particular kind of order e.g., an order too complex for us to describe at the present time, then many of our perceptions in science and life will need to change accordingly.

    The G.O.D. Experiments

  • We evidently see that motion, however regular in our mind, that order, however beautiful to our admiring optics, yields to what we term disorder, to that which we designate frightful confusion, as soon as new causes, not analogous to the preceding, either disturb or suspend their action.

    The System of Nature, Volume 2

  • At that time, depression became more legitimized as "real" because of the effectiveness of Prozac, which showed that this disorder is a chemical imbalance, not the person just being lazy.

    A Talk with Paula Kamen, author of All in My Head

  • Gen. Chiarelli is urging the Army and medical establishment to omit the word "disorder" from the condition widely known as post-traumatic stress disorder, to reduce the stigma and encourage affected soldiers and veterans to seek help.

    Army Suicide Rate Begins to Level Off

  • In many cases, this disorder is also misdiagnosed as reflux ....

    Something Else to Worry About: Eosinophilic Esophagitis

  • Yet what they label a disorder may in fact be a variation in sexual desire.

    OUR BODIES, OURSELVES

  • In a televised address to the people of Britain, the prime minister, Mr. Blair, said he ordered his nation's troops, 40,000 or so, into action to protect against a new threat of what he described as disorder and chaos.

    CNN Transcript Mar 20, 2003

  • So severely had she blamed the conduct of Mademoiselle de la Valliere, while often vehemently denouncing that which she termed the disorder at

    Court Memoirs of France Series — Complete

  • As order then, a fixed order, we may say, subject to deviations real or apparent, must be admitted to exist in the whole Nature of things, that which we call disorder or evil as it seems to us, does not in any way alter the fact of the general constitution of things having a Nature or fixed order.

    The Philosophy of Antoninus, by George Long, M. A

  • As order then, a fixed order, we may say, subject to deviations real or apparent, must be admitted to exist in the whole nature of things, that which we call disorder or evil, as it seems to us, does not in any way alter the fact of the general constitution of things having a nature or fixed order.

    Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

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