Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Possessed at birth; inborn.
  • adj. Possessed as an essential characteristic; inherent.
  • adj. Of or produced by the mind rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of right and wrong.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Inborn; native; natural; as, innate vigor; innate eloquence.
  • adj. Originating in, or derived from, the constitution of the intellect, as opposed to acquired from experience; as, innate ideas. See a priori, intuitive.
  • adj. Joined by the base to the very tip of a filament; as, an innate anther.
  • v. To cause to exist; to call into being.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Inborn; native; natural
  • adj. Originating in, or derived from, the constitution of the intellect, as opposed to acquired from experience. See A priori, Intuitive.
  • adj. Joined by the base to the very tip of a filament.
  • transitive v. To cause to exit; to call into being.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Inborn; natural; pertaining to the inherited constitution of body or mind; not derived or acquired from any external source; especially, native to the mind; instinctive: as, an innate tendency to virtue or vice; innate ideas.
  • In botany: Borne on the apex of the supporting part: as, an innate anther, which is one that directly continues and corresponds to the apex of the filament.
  • Born within; originating within the matrix, or within the substance of the plant.
  • To bring or call into existence; inform.
  • In biology, characteristic of a species or common to the individuals of a species, or alike in parent and in offspring; hereditary; constitutional; congenital.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. being talented through inherited qualities
  • adj. not established by conditioning or learning
  • adj. present at birth but not necessarily hereditary; acquired during fetal development

Etymologies

Middle English innat, from Latin innātus, past participle of innāscī, to be born in : in-, in; see in-2 + nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin innātus ("inborn"), perfect active participle of innāscor ("be born in, grow up in"), from in ("in, at on") + nāscor ("be born"); see natal, native. (Wiktionary)

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