Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or formed by a meteoroid.
  • adj. Of or relating to the earth's atmosphere.
  • adj. Similar to a meteor in speed, brilliance, or brevity: a meteoric rise to fame.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of, pertaining to, or originating from a meteor.
  • adj. Like a meteor in speed, brilliance, or ephemeralness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a meteor, or to meteors; atmospheric
  • adj. Influenced by the weather.
  • adj. Flashing; transient and brilliant, like a meteor{3}.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of the upper air; ethereal; empyreal.
  • Pertaining to or of the nature of a meteor; consisting of meteors: as, meteoric stones; meteoric showers.
  • Flashing like a meteor; transiently or irregularly brilliant.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or pertaining to atmospheric phenomena, especially weather and weather conditions
  • adj. like a meteor in speed or brilliance or transience
  • adj. pertaining to or consisting of meteors or meteoroids

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The men who now and then flash across our intellectual heavens, drawing all eyes for the moment, these I call meteoric men.

    The Last Harvest

  • It wasn't long ago that Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann's rise to the top of the Republican field of presidential candidates was called "meteoric."

    News

  • A politician's rapid rise to power is often called meteoric.

    NYT > Home Page

  • His rise in the Senate was remarkable in its speed and depth, and would likely be the subject of closer attention had his fellow Senator, Barack Obama, not coined the meteoric rise only two years before.

    Dylan Loewe: Why Jim Webb Should be Obama's Running Mate

  • His rise to front-runner is described as meteoric, his speeches as mesmerizing, his crowds as enraptured, his charisma as boundless.

    Journalists’ votes matter « BuzzMachine

  • Pukes, but is now a vast expanse of bare rock, from which every particle of soil and everything movable, including people, animals and vegetation, have been lifted by terrific cyclones and scattered afar, falling in other lands and at sea in the form of what was called meteoric dust!

    The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Volume 1

  • It was only a small black mass of what is now called meteoric iron, which sometimes comes down with meteorites from the sky, but it was shaped like a shield, and the people thought it an image of the warlike shielded Goddess, fallen from Heaven.

    Tales of Troy: Ulysses, the sacker of cities

  • When my fears and astonishment had in some degree subsided, I had little difficulty in supposing it to be some mighty volcanic fragment ejected from that world to which I was so rapidly approaching, and, in all probability, one of that singular class of substances occasionally picked up on the earth, and termed meteoric stones for want of a better appellation.

    Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque. In Two Volumes. Vol. II

  • The greater part of them were in a state of evident eruption, and gave me fearfully to understand their fury and their power by the repeated thunders of the miscalled meteoric stones which now rushed upwards by the balloon with a frequency more and more appalling.

    Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque. In Two Volumes. Vol. II

  • The greater part of them were in a state of evident eruption, and gave me fearfully to understand their fury and their power, by the repeated thunders of the miscalled meteoric stones, which now rushed upward by the balloon with a frequency more and more appalling.

    The Works of Edgar Allan Poe — Volume 1

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