Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The condition of being servile.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality or state of being servile; servileness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or character of being servile.
  • n. Mean submission; baseness; slavishness; obsequiousness; slavish deference.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. abject or cringing submissiveness

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Kant's calling servility, suicide, et al. “vices” may strike us as unusual, given that these vices are (on the face of it) not qualities or dispositions, but ways of acting.

    Kant and Hume on Morality

  • She felt a fine scorn for the woman who, under the circumstances, would insist upon a bond and all a man's worldly goods in return for that which it was her privilege to give freely; while the notion of servility, of economic dependence -- though she did not so phrase it -- repelled her far more than the possibility of social ruin.

    The Dwelling Place of Light — Volume 2

  • But do not confound it with servility, which is a mean thing; it is the badge of a slave or a sycophant.

    Scraps of African Methodist Episcopal History

  • There is a point in the life both of an individual and a society at which submission and faith, such as at a later period would be justly called servility and credulity, are useful qualities. -- i.

    Famous Reviews

  • He loved the sound of his own voice inordinately, and though (with something too off-hand to call servility) he would always hasten to agree with anything you said, yet he could never suffer you to say it to an end.

    Across the Plains: With Other Memories and Essays

  • It was once the glory of the Tories that, through all changes of fortune, they were animated by a steady and fervent loyalty which made even error respectable, and gave to what might otherwise have been called servility something of the manliness and nobleness of freedom.

    Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches — Volume 4

  • There is a season in the life both of an individual and of a society, at which submission and faith, such as at a later period would be justly called servility and credulity, are useful qualities.

    The History of England, from the Accession of James II — Volume 1

  • In Wales the Labour Party had kept the working class in a state of 'servility' for two generations.

    Radical Wales

  • a man's worldly goods in return for that which it was her privilege to give freely; while the notion of servility, of economic dependence -- though she did not so phrase it -- repelled her far more than the possibility of social ruin.

    The Dwelling Place of Light — Complete

  • But when a government official abuses their power because a citizen exhibited insufficient servility, that is not the citizen’s fault.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Gates Charges Dropped:

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