Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The state or quality of being arrogant; overbearing pride.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act or habit of arrogating, or making undue claims in an overbearing manner; that species of pride which consists in exorbitant claims of rank, dignity, estimation, or power, or which exalts the worth or importance of the person to an undue degree; proud contempt of others; lordliness; haughtiness; self-assumption; presumption.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act or habit of arrogating, or making undue claims in an overbearing manner; that species of pride which consists in exorbitant claims of rank, dignity, estimation, or power, or which exalts the worth or importance of the person to an undue degree; proud contempt of others; lordliness; haughtiness; self-assumption; presumption.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The condition or quality of being arrogant; a manifest feeling of personal superiority in rank, power, dignity, or estimation; the exalting of one's own worth or importance to an undue degree; pride with contempt of others; presumption.
  • n. Synonyms Pride, Arrogance, Presumption, Assumption, Haughtiness, Disdain, Loftiness, Superciliousness, Insolence, lordliness, self-importance, imperiousness, swagger. (See pride.) Pride and disdain are the only words in the list that may have a good meaning when applied to persons: as, pride in one's country; disdain of a base suggestion. Pride primarily respects the temper of the mind, not being necessarily manifested or directed toward others; it is the general term for an unreasonable estimate of one's own superiority in any respect. As it comes into relation and action, it may receive other titles. Thus, arrogance is, at its simplest, pride with contempt of others, and is essentially the same as disdain. In action, arrogance is the assertion of exorbitant claims to rank, dignity, estimation, homage, power, etc. Presumption is often used for arrogance, but more properly expresses a self-conceited and self-important forwardness to run risks, take liberties, and crowd in where one does not deserve to be. Presumption helps itself to what it wants, while arrogance claims from others, and feeds its pride by seeing them yield. Presumption is less selfish than arrogance, but more conceited and headstrong. Assumption has added to its other meanings a bad sense, kindred to presumption; it means a disposition to do what does not belong to one to do, and sometimes to claim to be more than one is. Haughtiness, like disdain and loftiness, dwells upon the inferiority of others quite as much as upon its own elevation; it is equally applicable to spirit and to manner. Disdain is a mingling of lofty contempt with aversion, abhorrence, or indignation. Superciliousness, as befits its derivation, is chiefly applied to manner; it is a manifested haughtiness. Insolence is exhibited not only in manner, but in conduct and language; it is pride or haughtiness, shown in contemptuous or overbearing treatment of others, especially by words; from an equal or an inferior it is an outrageous kind of impertinence. See impudence, egotism, and scorn.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiors

Etymologies

Old French, from Latin arrogantia. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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